GrowNYC International Harvest Dinner

November 20, 2017
Posted in Greenmarket

Earlier this month, GrowNYC held the second in our Chef Seasonal Dinner Series.

It was magnificent!

Five leading chefs from some of NYC’s most prominent restaurants donated their time and incredible culinary skills to create an unforgettable meal.

The theme of the dinner was International Harvest. Chef Ron Roselli of Bowery Road kicked things off with passed hors d’oeurves, including Fried Mushroom with a Citrus Aioli and Calabrian Chili, as well as Sicilian Cauliflower with Pine Nuts and a Chili Garlic Vinaigrette, which were followed by Sacco Chicken Stew with Bitter Orange and Dominican Root Vegetables prepared by Chef Charles Rodriguez of Print.  The second course, prepared by Iceland native Chef Gunnar Gíslason of Agern, consisted of Honeynut Squash with Sea Buckthorn, Honey and Brown Butter.  Next was Octopus with Salsa Veracruzana and Blue Eye Potatoes created by Chef Daniela Soto-Innes of Cosme, inspired by the cooking of Chef Sotto-Innes’s home country, Mexico.  And finally, for dessert, Chef Miro Uskokovic from Gramercy Tavern reimagined an Apple “Lazy” Pie with Baklava Ice Cream and Cranberry from his childhood in Serbia. And because two desserts are better than one, he made Serbian-inspired Truffles with Slivovitz and Cacao Prieto.

Magnificent. (It must be said again.)

This year marks the 18th anniversary of GrowNYC's New Farmer Development Program which provides assistance and opportunity for immigrants with backgrounds in agriculture looking to continue a career in farming in the Northeast. To celebrate, participants of that program, Sergio and Paz Nolasco of Nolasco Farms, gave a short speech about what Greenmarket means to their business.  

All the proceeds from the event allow Greenmarket to use Project Farmhouse throughout the year as an educational space for youth programming, panel discussions, film screenings, and networking events focused on a just and sustainable local food system.  We’re deeply grateful to all of the participating chefs, as well as Bread Alone, Breuckelen Distilling, Brooklyn Brewery, Great Performances, Lauber Imports, Library of Distilled Spirits, Omni New York LLC, and Union Square Wines for their help and support for our International Harvest Dinner. Photography by Vitaliy Piltser.

Looking forward to the next one!

Project Farmhouse International Harvest Dinner

 

Thanksgiving - Greenmarket Schedule and Recipes

October 30, 2017
Posted in Greenmarket

It's almost our favorite food holiday, THANKSGIVING, and the markets are abundant with all of the ingredients you need for a delicious meal. Check our our Global Thanksgiving Recipe Packet to start planning your meal.

We will have some schedule changes to accommodate shopping schedules, see below.

And don't forget to pre-order your Greenmarket turkey

*Market days with an asterisk mean it's a special market, rescheduled to Tuesday or Wednesday, normally held on a Thursday or Friday, so that customers have an opportunity to shop for Thanksgiving ingredients. Compost and textile collections are the same for regular and rescheduled markets, unless otherwise noted. 

Monday, 11/20: 
Union Square, MHTN open 8am-6pm (food scrap collections, 8am-5pm; clothing collection, 8am-4pm)

Tuesday, 11/21: 
Bowling Green, MHTN open 8am-5pm (food scrap collection, 8am-2pm)
Brooklyn Borough Hall, BK open 8am-5pm 
Bronx Borough Hall, BX open 8am-4pm Last day for the season (food scrap collection, 8am-2pm; clothing collection, 8am-2pm)
City Hall, MHTN open 8am-4pm 
*Columbia, MHTN open 8am-5pm (food scrap collection, 8am-3pm; no clothing collection)
Elmhurst Hospital, QNS open 8am-4pm Last day for the season
Ft. Washington, MHTN open 8am-4pm Last day for the season (food scrap collection, 8am-3pm; clothing collection, 8am-3pm)
Greenmarket at Oculus Plaza, MHTN open 7am-7pm 
Lincoln Hospital, BX open 8am-3pm Last day for the season
Poe Park, BX open 8am-3pm (food scrap collection, 8am-1:30pm; clothing collection, 8am-1:30pm)
South Williamsburg, BK open 8am-4pm Last day for the season
Staten Island Ferry Terminal, MHTN open 8am-7pm 
*Union Square, MHTN open (Friday producers) 8am-6pm (food scrap collections, 8am-5pm)

Wednesday 11/22:  
*97th Street, MHTN open 8am-2pm (food scrap collection, 8am-2pm; no clothing collection) 
57th Street, MHTN open 8am-5pm
Astoria, QNS open 8am-3pm Last day for the season
Bartel-Pritchard, BK open 8am-3pm 
*Bowling Green, MHTN open 8am-5pm 
*City Hall Park, MHTN open 8am-4pm
Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, MHTN open 8am-4pm (food scrap collection, 8am-3pm; clothing collection, 8am-3pm)
Flushing, QNS open 8am-4pm Last day for the season (food scrap collection, 8am-1pm) 
Fordham Plaza, BX open 8am-4pm
Learn It, Grow It, Eat It Youthmarket, BX open 10am-3pm Last day for the season (food scrap collection, 10am-2pm)
Mount Sinai, MHTN open 8am-5pm Last day for the season (food scrap collection, 8am-2pm; clothing collection, 8am-2pm)
PS 57 Youthmarket, MHTN open 9am-4pm Last day for the season
Tribeca, MHTN open 8am-3pm (food scrap collection, 8am-1pm; clothing collection, 8am-1pm)
*Tucker Square, MHTN open 8am-5pm (food scrap collection, 8am-3:30pm) 
Union Square Wednesday, MHTN open 8am-6pm (food scrap collection, 8am-5pm) 
Woodhull Youthmarket, BX open 8am-3pm Last day for the season

Thursday 11/23 & Friday 11/24:
All Greenmarkets closed. No clothing or food scrap collections.

Saturday 11/25 & Sunday 11/26
Regular schedule

Greenmarket Thanksgiving Turkey Guide

October 24, 2017
Posted in Greenmarket

Thanksgiving is just around the corner—November 23rd, to be exact—and turkey orders are already filling fast! Find out below what local farms are bringing pasture-raised Thanksgiving turkeys to your neighborhood Greenmarket.

You can also find the freshest side dish ingredients such as Brussels sprouts, carrots, fennel, winter squash, potatoes, apples, pears, herbs, honey, maple syrup, pre-made pies, butter, and cream. In addtion to those items, don't forget craft beverages -- we have beer, spirits, and hard cider made from 100% locally-grown ingredients, as well as pickles and condiments for your leftover turkey sandwiches, and much more. 

Dipaola Turkey

Breed: Broad Breasted White (parts and sausage also available)
Where to order: Online at www.dipaolaturkeyfarm.com/special-orders/
Where to pick up: 

79th Street Sunday, 11/19
97th Street Friday, 11/22 
Abingdon Square Saturday, 11/18
Brooklyn Borough Hall Saturday, 11/18
Carroll Gardens Sunday, 11/19
Columbia Sunday, 11/19
Cortelyou Sunday, 11/19
Forest Hills, 11/19
Fort Greene Saturday, 11/18
Grand Army Plaza Saturday, 11/18 

Greenpoint Saturday, 11/18
Inwood Saturday, 11/18
Jackson Heights Sunday, 11/19
Stuyvesant Town Sunday, 11/19
Tribeca Saturday, 11/18
Union Square Wednesday, 11/22

† Market open Wednesday before Thanksgiving for pick-ups.

Quattros Game Farm

Breeds: New Holland White, Bourbon Red, Wild 
Where and how to order: Union Square Greenmarket Saturdays or call the farm store at 845.635.2018
Where and when to pick up: Union Square Greenmarket on Saturday, 11/18 or Wednesday, 11/22
https://www.facebook.com/QuattrosFarm/

Tamarack Hollow Farm

Breeds: Broad Breasted Bronze, Bourbon Red
Where and how to order: Union Square Greenmarket Wednesdays 
Where and when to pick up: Union Square Greenmarket on Wednesday, 11/22
tamarackhollowfarm.com/thanksgiving-turkey

Fiesty Acres Farm

Breeds: Heritage Breed Bourbon Red
Where and how to order: Union Square Greenmarket Friday
Where and when to pick up: Union Square Greenmarket on Friday, 11/17 or Tuesday, 11/21
www.feistyacres.com

Violet Hill Farm

Breed: Broad Breasted White 
Where and how to order: Union Square Greenmarket SaturdaysMcCarren Park/Greenpoint Saturdays, or online at www.violethillfarm.com/turkey-2017
Where and when to pick up: Union Square Greenmarket or McCarren Park/Greenpoint Greenmarket on Saturday, 11/18 or Union Square Greenmarket Wednesday, 11/22
www.violethillfarm.com

Roxbury Mountain Maple

Breeds: Dutch Broad Breasted White 
Where and how to order: Union Square Greenmarket Mondays and Wednesdays, the Greenmarket at Oculus Plaza Tuesdays or Columbia Greenamarket Thursday, via their website or call the farm store at 607.422.0059
Where and when to pick up: Union Square Greenmarket on Monday, 11/20, Union Square Greenmarket Wednesday, 11/22 or Columbia Greenmarket Tuesday, 11/21
www.roxburymountainmaple.com
† Columbia University Market open Tuesday before Thanksgiving for pick-ups.

Sun Fed Beef

Breed: Narragansett 
Where and how to order: Reserve in advance at www.sunfedbeef.com or by emailing mike@sunfedbeef.com (reservation/deposit required) 
Where and when to pick up: Staten Island Mall Greenmarket and Tribeca Greenmarket on Saturday, 11/11 or 11/18, and Jackson Heights Greenmarket and Cortelyou Greenmarket on Sunday, 11/12 or 11/19

June Russell Honored as Slow Food NYC's 2017 Snailblazer

October 17, 2017
Posted in Greenmarket

On Wednesday, November 8th, Slow Food NYC will host its annual big bash fundraiser, the Slow Down, at GrowNYC’s Project Farmhouse steps from the Union Square Greenmarket. Slow Food NYC will honor their sixth Snailblazer, June Russell, in recognition of her outstanding leadership in creating a sustainable and fair regional farm and food chain. Since 2004, June has helped build and support a thriving regional grain economy through GrowNYC’s Greenmarket Regional Grains Project. The Regional Grains Project is dedicated to creating a marketplace for grains grown and milled in the Northeast, by educating and bringing together growers, processors, bakers, brewers, distillers, chefs, and eaters in a regional grain chain. Their mission begins at Greenmarket, where the bakers’ standard includes the use of flour made from grains grown and milled in our region.

We sat down with June to talk about her incredible work reinvigorating grain growing in the Northeast. 

Did you ever think you’d be working with grains for 10 years? 

Laughs. No. I had no idea what I was getting into or where it would lead. Initially, I was disappointed when Greenmarket asked me to tackle the “issue of bakers.”  I wasn’t sure it mattered.  Boy was I wrong.  Early on, I realized the potentially enormous impact of working with the staple crops on a regional level—to healthy soils, to system resilience, and to what ends up on our plates. Now, I have a sense of awe being a part of something that has become so much bigger and broader than our little quest to see if there was such a thing as local flour.

Do you think about where you’ll be in another 10 years?

I’m just starting to think about that now that we’ve laid some groundwork. We established a social enterprise—the Grainstand—and now we’re deep in strategic planning to determine what’s next. We have terrific, dedicated staff, ready to take things to the next level, which is key because some long-term objectives will take a generation to develop. But the food culture and the agriculture are now growing in tandem, and that’s incredible. Consumers in NYC are helping to create a stronger, more viable regional food system, and those changes are evident in the fields and in the new burgeoning infrastructure. This includes everything from crop diversity to soil health, carbon sequestration and developing de-centralized infrastructure that goes beyond the market to something like food sovereignty and resilience moving into the future. Yet this growth is unequivocally connected to the markets, so that is our focus.

What was the initial spark that kicked off the Greenmarket Regional Grains Project?

The initiative predated my time in my current role. It came from the Greenmarket Farmer and Community Advisory Committee (FCAC) as an effort to make bakers more mission supportive. There were several starting points, and there was a lot of foundational work and conversations that happened, but I can pinpoint two key moments that really gave us momentum.  One was Indrani Sen’s 2008 NYT article about northeast grains, and a group of farmers and bakers working to dispel the myth that New York’s agricultural conditions were not conducive to growing high quality wheat.  That piece really planted a seed, so to speak, not just with us, but throughout the country. Ironically, we pitched her the story to divert her attention away from other topics she was exploring at Greenmarket that, as new management, we were not ready for.  Greenmarket Director Michael Hurwitz said, “give her something positive to write about, like bakers.”  I was just starting to meet the people who would become our long-time allies. That story really rooted in the national imagination.

The second was a conference we hosted with Northeast Organic Farming Association- New York (NOFA-NY) in early 2010 that brought Greenmarket allies—shoppers bakers, and chefs—into the conversation. Things really took off after that day, and we started to receive grant funding to work on various aspects of the grain equation. Meanwhile, along with our bakers (who were required to use 15% local flours to remain eligible to sell at Greenmarkets), those allies started purchasing and creating demand to help drive the initial market. There were a few distillers in the room that day as well, who, along with farm brewers, were just getting started. (Craft bev. came along in 2012.)

It’s important to view this in the context of the local foods movement and, perhaps, the recession of 2008. I think we would have failed ten years prior. But by 2010, there were people fully dedicated to using as much as possible from local farms, as well as an explosion of small artisanal businesses backed by entrepreneurs looking to innovate, take risks, and launch commercial mills and distilleries, malting facilities, things that had not been done for over 100 years.  And things keep going…

As a region, we are still in startup phase.

I could go on and on. If you want to know more, I recently talked about these early years on a podcast for Heritage Radio.

What’s your favorite local grain?

 Emmer. Of course.

What grain has the most potential?

 Emmer. Of course.

Why?

It’s high in protein and highly resilient in the field against weather and climate fluctuations. For anyone looking to move away from the consumption of obscene amounts of animal protein, emmer is an excellent, plant-based replacement. It should be a staple on local menus. It’s delicious. I’m very fond of buckwheat too, and it plays an essential role on farms, and we can produce way more then we can sell right now.

Who is your Grains inspiration?

There are many unsung heroes at the grassroots level, mostly women (surprise, surprise). They are really the backbone of systemic change, working closely with farmers and shepherding the painstakingly slow work of research, field trials, and technical assistance to growers.  Julie Dawson, Lisa Kucek, Heather Darby, Elizabeth Dyck, Ellen Mallory, Eli Rogosa, to name a few on the east coast. And then there are our amazing female entrepreneurs like Andrea Stanley, lady maltstress (can there be a cooler occupation?) Amber Lambke of Maine Grains, and Mary-Howell Martens of Lakeview Organic. The Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Working Group (NESAWG) strongly advocates for a regional approach and thinking in terms of systems, which has been helpful.

My grains guardian angel is Karen Hess. I met her at the 97th St. Greenmarket when I was a manager there. Before she passed away in 2007, she gave me a paper she had written on bread and flour, which has become our guiding document. It also provided a framework for us: work with what we can grow, what the land wants to give.  

Did you encounter any resistance at first?

That’s what the local bourbon is for.

Has rebranding the image of Grains been a challenge?

Huuuge! Until relatively recently, grains and flour were total non-entities in the culinary world. Getting people to take them seriously, not only in the cooking realm but by other food and agricultural advocates, can still be a struggle--though a case has been made and we have great bread to prove it. Still, there’s enormous amounts of work to be done as we continue to educate consumers and develop the market.

Grains and flour in our food system, and on our plates, are both all-encompassing and invisible at the same time--like being immersed in water. I’ve come to realize how commodity has everyone calibrated to the same specs, and we have lost what we now recognize as grain “literacy,” something that has been missing for almost 100 years. Happily, we are seeing some terrific new grain based products come into the market, and bakers are reconnecting to their primary ingredient. I can’t think of a better time to be a baker.

What’s your favorite craft beverage?

I’m super excited about all the rye whiskeys that are coming along. Some are just starting to hit with a little age on them at 4-5 years (given that Governor Cuomo’s craft beverage initiative only kicked in around 2012).  It’s been incredible to witness the launch and subsequent maturation of a whole new sector in food and agriculture, to see producers and consumers sprout up, and to literally co-create what we hope will be a more sustainable and resilient future. Distilleries and mills have their place as essential facilities in a localized food system. Cheers!

 

 

Harvest Dinner at Project Farmhouse

October 6, 2017
Posted in Greenmarket

On Thursday, November 2, join GrowNYC for the next installment of our Greenmarket Seasonal Dinner Series!  Grab your passport because the theme for this seated, four-course feast, prepared by a coterie of celebrated NYC chefs, is International Harvest.

The menu will feature passed hors d’oeuvres from Chef Ron Rosselli of Bowery Road, a Mexican dish created and prepared by James Beard-award-winning Chef Daniela Soto-Innes of Cosme, a Dominican course from Chef Charles Rodriguez of PRINT., Icelandic fare from Michelin-starred Agern's Chef Gunnar Gislason, and a Serbian dessert from Michelin-starred Gramercy Tavern's Pastry Chef, Miro Uskokovic. 

Harvest Dinner: International Cooking with Local Ingredients 
by Greenmarket/GrowNYC
WHEN: Thursday, November 2
WHERE: GROWNYC'S PROJECT FARMHOUSE, 76 East 13th Street
6pm-9pm: Harvest Dinner Fundraiser: International Cooking with Local Ingredients, benefiting GrowNYC's Project Farmhouse 

Individual Ticket, $300
Event Sponsor (includes 10 tickets), $5000
Or make a donation of any amount!
*The non-deductible portion of each ticket is $150, as this reflects the fair market value of goods and services to be provided at the event.

This fundraiser is the second in the Greenmarket Seasonal Dinner Series at GrowNYC's Project Farmhouse and will allow GrowNYC to continue working with partner organizations to offer Project Farmhouse as an educational space used for youth programming, panel discussions, film screenings, and networking events focused on a just and sustainable local food system.

Can't make it but want to make a donation to GrowNYC? Thank you, please do that here

Greenmarket Holiday Schedule - Labor Day Weekend & High Holidays

August 28, 2017
Posted in Greenmarket

Labor Day Weekend 
Saturday Greenmarkets:
ALL OPEN 
Sunday Greenmarkets: ALL OPEN
Labor Day: Union Square Greenmarket OPEN (Food Scrap Collections: YES / Clothing Collections: NONE)

High Holiday Market Schedule Changes
Thursday, September 21 (Rosh Hashanah): The South Williamsburg and Boro Park Greenmarkets will be rescheduled for Tuesday, September 19
Thursday, October 5 (Sukkot): The South Williamsburg and Boro Park Greenmarkets will be rescheduled for Tuesday, October 3
Thursday, October 12 (Shemini Atzeret): The South Williamsburg and Boro Park Greenmarkets will be rescheduled for Tuesday, October 10
All other Greenmarkets will be open on their regularly scheduled day. 

Find out details about each market at Our Markets.

Greenmarket Weather Schedule Changes

August 28, 2017
Posted in Greenmarket

Inclement weather in the city or in the greater region does affect markets;  markets may close early, or farmers may not be able to make it into the city.

Get real-time, up-to-date information here: 
Union Square Daily List of Producers in Attendance and the Union Square Greenmarket App

Manhattan Greenmarkets Facebook
Queens Greenmarkets Facebook
Brooklyn Greenmarkets Facebook 
Staten Island Greenmarkets Facebook
Farmer and Producer List and Social Media Links

 

Greenmarket Summer Resolutions

July 31, 2017
Posted in Greenmarket

Making New Year’s resolutions is a relatively easy thing to do; keeping them, on the other hand, is not always a piece of cake (especially when you resolved to give up cake). If you’re a little chagrined by your follow-through this year, fret not. You get another chance!

At GrowNYC, we believe in Summer Resolutions. There’s so much inspiration to be found at the Greenmarkets in the dog days of summer. Here are a few of our favorite Summer Resolutions:

  • New Market Adventure: Visit a Greenmarket you’ve never been to before. There are 51 of them throughout NYC. You may just find your favorite new farmer!
  • Take a Chance: Try a new (to you!) vegetable. Maybe it’s a tomatillo, a pattypan squash, or epazote—just something new. You could also experiment with a local grain from the Greenmarket Grainstand that you’ve never cooked with before. (Related hot tip: keep an eye out for naked barley).
  • Gear Up for Winter: Connect with your inner squirrel and prepare for winter. All those beautiful fruits and vegetables at market now can be enjoyed year-round…with a little planning. Here are some tips for freezing, jamming, and pickling
  • Many Greenmarket farmers welcome visitors for wine tastings, apple picking, and tours - head out of town to visit them
  • Fertilizing Fervor: With more and more compost drop-off sites popping up all around the city, now’s the perfect time to make good on that vow to start composing. It’s like nature’s way of recycling, and it feels great.

This list could go on and on--Cook more fish! Make it Locally-Sourced Fish! Consistently Pack a Lunch!--but we’ve got just over 60 days of summer left. We hope you enjoy it!

The State of Seafood with Paul Greenberg and Blue Moon Fish

May 31, 2017
Posted in Greenmarket

Join GrowNYC and Greenmarket for a conversation with Paul Greenberg and Stephanie Villani about the current state of seafood and politics surrounding the fishing industry.

Paul Greenberg, sustainable fisheries expert and New York Times bestselling author, is featured in the PBS Frontline special, "The Fish on My Plate," airing April 25, 2017.  Stephanie and her husband Alex own Blue Moon Fish, a family operation that catches wild, local fish off the coast of Mattituck, on the North Folk of Long Island. 

Sustainable Seafood Q & A and Cookbook Release Celebration
Thursday, June 15th
4pm-6pm, $15

Earlier in the evening, eventgoers will grab a drink and seafood appetizer prepared by Bowery Road restaurant before participating in a Q & A with Paul and Stephanie, and celebrate the release of Stephanie's new cookbook, "The Fisherman's Wife." 
Tickets here

Summer Seafood Dinner
Thursday, June 15th
7pm-10pm, $300 or sponsorship table of 10, $5000 
(Table host recognized at event and featured in electronic event materials)
Dinner ticket holders will enjoy cocktails and passed hors d’oeuvres followed by a seated four-course dinner, featuring local and sustainably-sourced seafood and shellfish, prepared by Bill Telepan of Oceana, Melissa Rodriguez of Del Posto, Howard Kalachnikoff of Gramercy Tavern, Kerry Heffernan of Grand Banks, and Ron Paprocki of Gotham Bar and Grill. Spirits have been generously donated by New York Distilling Company and beer by Brooklyn Brewery
Tickets here
*The non-deductible portion of each ticket is $150, as this reflects the fair market value of goods and services to be provided at the event.

This fundraiser is the first in the Greenmarket Seasonal Dinner Series at GrowNYC's Project Farmhouse and will allow GrowNYC to continue working with partner organizations to offer Project Farmhouse as an educational space used for panel discussions, film screenings, and networking events focused on a just and sustainable local food system.

Announcing #GMKTnyc and the Official GrowNYC Hashtag Guide! 

May 3, 2017
Posted in Greenmarket

There are so many ways to connect with us at market and online, but now we want to see all your best photos in one place. We’re happy to introduce #GMKTnyc. 

GMKT stands for Greenmarket, and nyc is, well NYC: this phenomenal city where we operate over 50 Greenmarkets. We want to see your peak produce photos, what seasonal recipes you’re cooking, what farmers are farming, and more. Throughout the week we'll regram our favorites across all our accounts. (P.S. Be sure to follow them all here!)

In addition to using #GMKTnyc, tag us in other ways,  whether you’re shopping in Brooklyn, Queens, Manhattan, or the Bronx! 

GMKTNYC.jpg

#GMKTDogs
For all those shots of your darling dog shopping with you at market. 

GMKTDOGS.jpg

#GMKTHolidays
Cooking for a holiday with market ingredients? Snap a pic and share it! 

gmktholidays.jpeg

#OhSNAPnyc
Did you buy something delicious with SNAP benefits or Health Bucks? Maybe you cooked a delicious meal with it. Tag us!

#letsGrowNYC
Tag GrowNYC in your photos and show us how you live sustainably in NYC!

#YMKTnyc
GrowNYC operates 18 Youthmarkets throughout NYC. Include #YMKTnyc on your photos featuring this magnificent program that brings fresh, affordable local produce to neighborhoods throughout the city while at the same time empowering NYC youth.

letsgrownyc.jpeg

#growtolearnnyc and #learntogrow
Gardens can be particularly photogenic. Photos of Grow-to-learn school gardens have an innate quality of determination. Spread the joy with either of these hashtags. 

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