Donate a Bag this November

October 26, 2021
Posted in Greenmarket

Greenmarket is partnering with City Harvest, Food Bank of New York City, Community Fridges in Upper Manhattan and the Bronx, and other local food rescue organizations to help feed New York City's hungry men, women, and children this Thanksgiving. 

At the markets listed below, buy an extra bag of fresh produce while you shop and donate it at the Market Information tent. 

Monday, November 1
Food Bank of New York City
Union Square Greenmarket

Wednesday, November 3
City Harvest
Union Square Greenmarket

Friday, November 5
Food Bank of New York City
Union Square Greenmarket

Saturday, November 6
City Harvest
Union Square Greenmarket

Sunday, November 14
City Harvest
77th Street Greenmarket

Wednesday, November 17
Food Bank of New York City
Dag Hammarskjold Greenmarket

Sunday, November 20
Food Bank of New York City
Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket 

Cider Village at the Union Square Greenmarket October 8

October 7, 2021
Posted in Greenmarket

Save the date for one of our most beloved annual events, the Union Square Greenmarket Cider Village, as part of Cider Week New York! For one day only, New York cidermakers from far and wide will join our Friday market lineup to sling their sippable fall flavors! From fruity to funky, sweet to dry, crisp and complex, to bubbly and tart, there’s a cider for everyone. Along the way, you’ll meet (and taste!) some rare apples varieties and learn more about the cider-pressing process as well as the history of the craft that takes one of our state’s most venerated and prolific crops and turns it into liquid gold!

Guest cidermakers will have their bottles on offer, along with some lovingly culled informational displays, pairings and recipes all about apples and cider. Pick up a bottle you’ve never tried before, grab another bottle for a holiday gift, and maybe learn something new!

Special guests will also be on hand! Gidon Coll of Hudson Valley Apple Project will host an apple varietal display that is sure to leave you gleefully in awe of the range one fruit can embody, and apple enthusiast and photographer William Mullan of @pomme_queen fame will be taking pre-orders of the second run of his new and currently sold out book, Odd Apples (12-2PM). The book is an ode to the apple tree and features 128 portraits of rare and interesting apple varieties and their histories. 

CIDER VILLAGE 
Union Square West (at 15th Street)
Date: Friday, October 8
Time: 10AM. - 5PM

Participating Cideries:

Metal House Cider
Original Sin Cider
East Hollow Cider
Hudson Valley Farmhouse Cider
Nine Pin Cider
 

Jazz Foundation at GrowNYC Greenmarkets

October 1, 2021
Posted in Greenmarket

Come out and hear Jazz Foundation musicians playing at GrowNYC Greenmarkets!

The Jazz Foundation of America, a non-profit organization based in Manhattan, provides retired professional jazz musicians with the opportunity to continue performing.

Through their "Gig Fund," the Jazz Foundation produces free, “pop-up” performances for underserved audiences. The shows take place in public spaces as opposed to traditional and costly venues, and engage new audiences who would not otherwise have the chance to hear these accomplished players. We are thrilled to announce the schedule of performers coming out to GrowNYC Greenmarkets. 

FALL SCHEDULE JAZZ FOUNDATION
AT GROWNYC GREENMARKETS 

 October 9

    57th Street Saturday Greenmarket

    Will Terrill Band

 October 10

    92nd Street Sunday Greenmarket 

    Rick Fiori Band

 October 12

    Brooklyn Borough Hall Tuesday Greenmarket

    Band TBD

 October 14

    Myrtle-Wyckoff Thursday Greenmarket 

    Jerry Griffin


Presented in partnership with the Jazz Foundation of America, with partial support from the National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council

Doctor's Orders!

August 11, 2021
Posted in Greenmarket

Two health insurance companies partner with GrowNYC to promote healthy eating among their members. 

Healthfirst recognizes that poor diet, a prominent risk factor linked to death and disease in the United States, is modifiable, and the health insurance company has partnered with GrowNYC to allow Medicaid and Medicare members to spend benefits (about $150 per month!) at our Greenmarkets, Farmstands, and Fresh Food Box sites on fresh fruits and vegetables.

Similarly, MetroPlus, another insurance company here in New York, is incentivizing healthy eating by providing Greenmarket Bucks (for use at GrowNYC food retail sites) to its members who have certain diet related illnesses.  

These programs, both focused on the connection between health and diet, are lauded at GrowNYC, where we work to provide access for all New Yorkers to healthy, fresh food while simultaneously promoting regional agriculture.  

Perhaps more health insurance companies will be inspired to launch similar programs, moving us closer to a health care system that integrates healthy habits for members and, by promoting local food, for the environment. 

 
Here’s a link for more information about GrowNYC’s partnership with Healthfirst, and here you will find further details on Greenmarket Bucks for MetroPlus members

Seed Donation Drive for St. Vincent Farmers

June 15, 2021
Posted in Greenmarket

St. Vincent & the Grenadines farmers were severely impacted by the recent volcanic eruptions at La Soufrière. Please help by donating seed packets. 

SEEDS THAT GROW IN A TROPICAL ENVIRONMENT NEEDED
*Please make sure the seeds are properly labeled and sealed 

Herbs: Basil, Parsley, Sage, Rosemary, Garlic, Thyme
Vegetables: Broccoli, Peas, Beans, Cucumber, Butternut Squash, Zucchini, ,Okra, Tomatoes, Sweet Peppers, Pumpkins, Scallions, Onions, Spinach, Beets, Carrots, Cabbage, Lettuce, Sweet Corn, Arugula
Fruits: Cantaloupe, Watermelon, Honey Dew

DROP-OFF LOCATIONS & DATES
Saturdays, July 24, 31

Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket, Bk
Union Square Greenmarket, Mhtn 


Sunday, July 25
Cortelyou Greenmarket, Bk
Forest Hills Greenmarket, Qns 


Or mail seeds by July 31:
GrowNYC
c/o Seed Donation Drive 
PO Box 2327
NY, NY 10272

Organized by the Flatbush Caton Market and GrowNYC
Benefitting the Windward Islands Farmers Association

 

Notice of Voluntary Recall, Hudson Valley Fisheries

June 7, 2021
Posted in Greenmarket

Notice of Voluntary Recall, Hudson Valley Fisheries 

GrowNYC has received notification from Greenmarket producer Hudson Valley Fisheries that due to the possibility of contamination they are voluntarily recalling the following products sold at their farm stand and other retailers.

  • Cold-Smoked Steelhead (“Trout Lox”)

No illnesses have been reported to date in connection with these products. This is a voluntary and precautionary recall initiated by Hudson Valley Fisheries. 

These products may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headaches, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea. Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

If you have an unopened cold-smoked pack that you purchased in May, please take a picture of it and send it to info@hudsonvalleyfisheries.com for a full refund.

Company Contact Information:
Hudson Valley Fisheries 
(914) 960-8549
info@hudsonvalleyfisheries

Letter from Hudson Valley Fisheries to their customers: 

We are reaching out because you recently purchased our Cold-Smoked Steelhead (“Trout Lox”). This week Banner Smoked Fish, the smokehouse that handles our cold-smoked trout, was issued a recall on all of its products smoked from May 8 - May 28 due to risk of contamination with Listeria monocytogenes bacteria. Our last shipment from Banner was on April 29. Out of an abundance of caution, we are recalling our cold-smoked items sold in May up to today. None of our other products are impacted by this incident. Rest assured, no illnesses have been reported and we have received no notice of contamination in our cold-smoked trout. We are taking all possible precautionary measures because our customers' health and safety are our top priority. If you have an unopened cold-smoked pack that you purchased in May, please take a picture of it and send it to us at info@hudsonvalleyfisheries.com for a full refund.

We apologize for any inconvenience and are here to address any questions or concerns you may have. Please feel free to contact us directly via email info@hudsonvalleyfisheries.com or give us a call at (914) 960-8549.

FDA Recall Notice 

 

Grown with Pride

June 2, 2021
Posted in Greenmarket

These interviews were recorded in June 2019. 

This month marks the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots and, essentially, the birth of the Pride movement in the United States. 

Since the opening of the first Greenmarket in 1976 at 59th Street and Second Avenue in Manhattan, GrowNYC has endeavored to create community spaces where everyone is welcome. At the Greenmarket, neighbors gather not only to buy fresh food, but to mingle and check in on each other. It creates a feeling of belonging; the composition of the many Greenmarket communities throughout the City reflects the invigorating diversity of NYC itself.

We are honored to count a number of LGBTQ Producers and stand workers among our farmer community.

Members of Transgenerational Farm, City Saucery, Moxie Ridge, and Rise & Root Farm have graciously shared with us their experiences as LGBTQ farmers, and every Tuesday during Pride Month, our Union Square Greenmarket publicity team will post one of their stories on the Union Square Greenmarket Instagram account.  

You can also read the unedited versions here on our blog. We’ll be updating it every week as they come in.

Our first Pride Month profile is with Jayne of Transgenerational Farm. Here’s the complete transcript:

GrowNYC:  How did you become a farmer?

Jayne: I come from a long line of conventional farmers in rural Kansas. My dad is a county extension agent, and as a kid my two older sisters and I were always involved in 4-H from ages 7-18.  I grew up in southwest Kansas where the prairies and wheat fields are so vast and flat you can see your dog run away for a week. My first jobs were working on local farms, and I learned how to drive a tractor before I could drive a car.

When I was a sophomore in college my uncle, a farmer, passed away from cancer most likely caused by conventional chemicals, and my family moved to the northeast part of the state to take over the farm. We grew conventional corn, wheat, soybeans, and beef cattle. I spent countless hours fixing fences, checking cows, cutting hay, tilling fields, and drilling grains. While I loved this work, and excelled at it, this was also the time that I was beginning to understand my feelings of gender dysphoria and starting down the long and difficult road of transitioning. I always felt like I didn't have a future in rural Kansas. While I had found a small and close trans family at college (Rock Chalk Jayhawk -- go KU!!) there were no trans farmers; people like me didn't exist in rural Kansas. So when I was offered a job with AmeriCorps in New York City, I jumped at the chance, hoping to find queer and trans community. I spent seven years in the city working at various non-profits and eventually found my way to GrowNYC where I worked as a Fresh Food Box coordinator. Being involved in food access and food justice and seeing the farms in the Hudson valley reinvigorated my passion for agriculture.

Suddenly I could see a future where queer people grew food for each other and worked the land and used our magic to nourish our community, and I wanted that. So I took the FARMrots program at GrowNYC, and then was accepted into the pro-farmer program at the Hudson Valley Farm Hub, where I am now in my third year. The pro-farmer program allowed me to make connections with Sustainability Farm through a mentorship program, and now I am co-stewarding land with them in Accord, NY, in the shadow of the beautiful Mohonk Ridge with clear slight of the Mohonk Mountain House, and a stone’s throw from the Rondout Creek!   

How long have you been a Greenmarket farmer and what is your experience as a part of the market community in NYC?

This is my first year selling at Greenmarket and I am EXTREMELY excited to be a part of the Greenmarket family. I have a long history with GrowNYC, and now to see that relationship come full circle and reunite as a producer feels like coming home!

How has your experience as a part of the LGBTQ community informed your experience as a farmer?

One of the main driving forces and philosophies in my work is the desire to connect people with agriculture who are traditionally excluded from it. As a rural queer I felt a lack of safety in my home rural spaces which ultimately left me to leave. LGBTQ people should know that we have a right to rural life as much as anyone.

****************************************************************************************************

Next, we heard from Michael at City Saucery.

GrowNYC: How and why did you start your business?

Michael: Back in 2010, our careers were going nowhere (our backgrounds are both in design--me furniture/interiors and Jorge with graphic design--so we're both very visual). At the time, my Italian mom, a native of Calabria (who is an artist in the kitchen), started cooking at a local restaurant and gained kind of a cult following, so we started cooking classes. Jorge and I would both organize and promote these events to get our minds off of our (then) aimless careers, and my mom would teach--people just loved her. One thing led to another and people started inquiring about the sauces that we would pair with the food my mom cooked. That inspired us to create more sauces. After operating out of a shared incubator for several years, and a short stint with a poorly managed co packer, we finally decided to take back 100% control and get our own facility. Luckily, we found one in South Brooklyn, and the country’s first Saucery was born. The idea was (and still is) to produce specialty food products with a modern twist since we are, after all, a modern family.

How long have you been a GrowNYC Greenmarket producer and what is your experience as part of the Greenmarket community in NYC?

This is our third season with Greenmarket, and it has been one of the best experiences we've ever had as producers. The platform we are so fortunate to access weekly has helped us gain significant brand awareness and a level of customer interaction wholesale could never provide.

How has your experience as part of the LGBTQ community informed your experience as a business owner/GMKT producer?

Well, as proud members of the LGBTQ+ community, we understand that money equals both freedom and sustainability, so we decided to start our own business to help navigate our future together as both business and life partners. I would never leave our future in the hands of politicians, and no member of the LGBTQ+ community should.

As producers, it’s fueled our creativity further by inspiring us to recreate what it means to be a pasta sauce honestly. The classic sauces are great so why touch that? It’s not our style or inspiration, so we produce a very familiar pantry item …but with a modern twist. This is why you’ll find very unique flavor profiles at our Greenmarket stand and never the classic sauces typically found in grocery stores that are produced for celebrity chefs and inaccessible restaurants. The American pantry needs some updating, and we’re here for it.

****************************************************************************************************

Third up in our Pride series is Lee Henessy.

Lee is the farmer and cheesemaker behind Moxie Ridge Farm. You can find him slinging cheese every Friday at GrowNYC’s Union Square Greenmarket.

This is what Lee has to say about finding happiness and selling at Greenmarket, as well as how the solitude he’s found while farming has helped him get in touch with who he is:

“I’m a first generation farmer, and I got into farming through sheer force of will. Before I was doing a lot of creative and corporate work. I hadn’t found happiness through trying to be successful, so I decided to focus on happiness first then work on the success part later. And that’s what brought me to goat farming.

I joined GrowNYC’s Union Square Greenmarket in August 2018. I’m a little bit fanboy about the Greenmarket because it is such an important and influential market. I was a little starstruck when I started to be selling with producers that helped to start it. It means a lot to me to be a part of this community -- in an emotional way but also as a point of pride, like ‘hey look, this little farm in Argyle NY with this crazy person who makes these ridiculous cheeses is standing shoulder to shoulder with these other producers.’ The market is also the backbone of my farm. It’s why I drive 3 hours and 45 minutes every Friday morning at 3am with my product that I have to pack up for an hour before I leave. I do it because it allows me the flexibility and support financially to make the types of cheeses and do the type of farming that I want to do.

I came out as bi when I was 19, and it was very recently, at 38, that I came out as a trans man. It wasn’t until I started farming and gave myself the space and support I needed running the farm that I was able to make some realizations about who I am. I’m not sure being trans or bi affects my farming more than any other part of me. What I hope people understand is that it’s more of the effects of living as a queer person in this world that affect my farming and business decisions. There’s a difference.

I can’t really say that being queer has affected my farming. I think good farmers are very individual. Being a bi, trans man has informed me as an individual, and that’s how I farm. That’s how I raise my animals, that’s how run my business. But I would say farming has affected my ability and strength to be out and queer in a weird way. It’s all connected somehow.”

****************************************************************************************************

For our final installment of this series during Pride Month, we talked to Michaela Hayes of Rise & Root Farm. Here’s what she had to say about farming as a member of the LGBTQ community:

Rise & Root Farm is in the Black Dirt region of Orange County, NY. We moved here from NYC in 2015 to start the farm. My wife Jane and I, along with our partners Karen Washington and Lorrie Clevenger, started the farm together. We all met through urban farming and community gardening in NYC. One of our farm goals is staying connected with our NYC communities, and being at GrowNYC’s Union Square Greenmarket is a big part of how we have been able to do that. Another way we stay connected is finding ways to bring people to the farm. We hold monthly community work days and lead tours. This year we've started hosting events, and on June 29th, we are holding a Farm Pride Tea Dance to bring together our farming and LGBTQ communities.

We're not afraid to do hard things - being gay and out where we live, being farmers, starting a business, running a cooperatively-owned farm that is interracial and intergenerational, gay and straight. Every step of the way we have chosen our path because we believe in it. We're proud to be who we are and to expand the representation of what farmers look like in the U.S. We started our farm in large part because of our commitment to social justice and our belief that everyone should have access to fresh, healthy, affordable food. We know we can't work that out on our own - we need widespread, systemic change to make this reality come true. Growing our farm in a way that models the world we want to live in is one way we contribute to that change. 

We picked the name Rise & Root Farm for a lot of reasons, but the visual that we need to root down while rising up runs deep with us. Our roots make us who we are - the communities we come from, the people who came before us that helped us walk our path, the activists who fought for our right to exist and have agency, the people who have taught us what we know, our families and our ancestors. Our roots are growing to include our new neighbors, other local businesses, our farmer neighbors, and our market community. These are the roots that we rely on to help us thrive.

We started out at Greenmarket with our sister fermentation business, Crock & Jar, in 2012 at GrowNYC’s Fort Greene Greenmarket. In 2015, we started selling at the Friday Union Square Greenmarket, where we have stayed since. The other NYC-based market you can find us at is La Familia Verde Farmers Market in the Crotona/E. Tremont neighborhood in the Bronx. 

Rise Up and Root Deep!

Sign our Petition to Restore Funding!

April 1, 2021
Posted in Greenmarket

Have you signed our petition yet? Right now, our local elected officials are negotiating NYC’s annual budget. Help us ask the City Council and Mayor to:

  • Restore GrowNYC's compost program to pre-COVID funding levels
  • Increase City Council's support for our food access programs

If you’ve already signed, THANK YOU! Please share our petition widely and follow SaveOurCompost on FacebookTwitter, and/or Instagram for updates.

Goodbye Plastic T-Shirt Bags April 1!

January 28, 2021
Posted in Greenmarket

Beginning April 1, GrowNYC Greenmarkets, Farmstands, and Fresh Food Box locations are banning single-use plastic t-shirt bags.

What is banned?

Greenmarket Producers, Farmstands, and Fresh Food Box locations will no longer be providing single-use plastic and compostable bags with handles.

Tips for going plastic-free: 

1. BYOBs! Bring your own reusable tote and produce bags while shopping. Don't forget to pack a big general tote bag and smaller bags and containers for individual items.    

2. Carry a few extra reusable totes with you at all times.  

3. Reduce before you reuse or recycle. It costs money and energy to produce and recycle plastic bags. 

4. Take the Commit to Bring It Pledge to bring your own mugs, water bottles, shopping bags.

 

New York Seafood Summit

January 26, 2021
Posted in Greenmarket | Tagged seafood

New York Sea Grant, in collaboration with industry, academic and other professional seafood stakeholders, including GrowNYC, is hosting its annual New York Seafood Summit virtually this year, in English and Spanish.

The goal of the summit is to convene a group of enthusiastic professionals with vested interest in seafood to build active communications between the various sectors of New York's seafood industry. 

Each year at the summit we try to highlight some of New York’s bountiful seafood supply and introduce participants to the delicious, diverse, and versatile seafood’s available locally. 

Participants must register in advance for panels and discussions. Registration information here.

NOTE: Click Here to view in Spanish (haga clic aquí para ver en español)

The 2021 Seafood Summit will be going virtual!

Monday, February 22nd 3-4 PM
Culinary Discussion and Demonstration with Chef Victoria Blamey | Register Here

Tuesday, February 23rd 3-4 PM - Flyer (PDF)
Recirculating Aquaculture in New York with John Ng of Hudson Valley Fisheries | Register Here

Wednesday, February 24th 3-4 PM
New York Fisheries with Captain Peter Haskell | Register Here

Thursday, February 25th 3-4 PM
Seafood Retail in NY with Fishmonger Warren Kremin | Register Here

Friday, February 26th 3-5 PM
Participant Lightning Talks
Any participant interested in sharing a program, project, or resource with the summit audience is welcome to submit a 2-3-minute lightning talk (Click Here). These talks will need to be pre-recorded and submitted to NY Sea Grant.

Industry Panel on Resilience to Crisis | Register Here
Industry and agency panelist will discuss the challenges of the 2020 pandemic, how it affected different sectors and how different sectors did or could adapt to the significant economic changes and be more resilient in the future.

We hope to see you at the 2021 Seafood Summit!

You can check out a news archive that highlights previous seafood summits.

Also, there's a story map highlighting the New York Seafood Summit, which began in 2016 as a means of highlighting seafood efforts across New York and provide an opportunity for cross sector collaboration.

Recent Posts

Programs

Tags

More tags

Archives