School is closed, but gardens are growing

June 30, 2020

In a moment where New Yorkers have turned to parks and gardening to ease the mental and emotional strain the Covid-19 pandemic has taken on residents, when the need for education surrounding nutrition and health couldn’t be more critical, the same nonprofits that make green space and nutrition education possible are in danger of going under, while vital city agencies like the New York City Parks Department’s GreenThumb program are facing severe budget cuts.

To date, GrowNYC School Gardens’ program has helped create 824 school gardens, the most in the nation, with a goal of having every New York City school have a garden of its own.

Following the Great Recession in 2010, the School Garden program was founded in partnership with GrowNYC, GreenThumb, and the Department of Education to create sustainable learning gardens in public schools. Since inception, the program has led over 400 free gardening workshops, hosted annual giveaways for seeds, soil, plants, lumber, and tools, and funded 650 yearly mini grants to make school gardens accessible.

The gardens come in a range of shapes and sizes. From pollinator gardens in outdoor raised beds to indoor hydroponics labs producing 25,000 pounds of greens, all share the goals of connecting kids with the natural world, inspiring healthy eating, and building community.

The end of the fiscal year is looming, and nonprofits like GrowNYC School Gardens face a reckoning. Because of government budget cuts, many are letting staff go and slashing program offerings just when the pandemic has generated an all-time high in gardening interest. In early June, GrowNYC’s Beginner Gardener Intensive, a free week of virtual gardening classes, drew over 1300 participants.

In New York City, access to school gardens is not equal. Green space is limited. Lack of resources, garden knowledge, support, funding, and community involvement are the primary reasons school gardens fail. Schools in socially affluent neighborhoods often have active PTAs to support maintenance and fundraising, while schools in lower socioeconomic areas often do not. These factors, coupled with the environmental challenges of growing in New York--rats, contamination, legal obstacles to obtain growing spaces-- make non-profit partners essential.

This is especially true for schools in underserved communities.

If we look at communities disproportionately impacted by Covid-19, they have the following in common: all are located in low socioeconomic areas with the least access to green space and the highest rate of diet-related diseases, primarily impacting people of color.

And yet the possibilities for gardens to flatten the curve in inequality are endless. In Corona, Queens, the garden at PS 14 was built in a concrete schoolyard after a science teacher, Bianca Biblioni, attended a Raised Bed Building workshop and picked up tools and seedlings from GrowNYC giveaway events outside of school hours. The garden is used for outdoor yoga, as a performance space for band and violin, and to teach culturally responsive-sustaining STEAM: Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts & Mathematics.

For Bianca, the garden has been pivotal in engaging students with disabilities and English Language Learners because her students can observe concepts that are difficult to grasp in textbooks. Through the garden, Bianca introduces the ways in which plants are used across cultural diasporas from the Huichol people of Mexico to the Ashanti people of West Africa. They have also grown corn, beans, and squash, known as the “Three Sisters” in Native American culture, to learn about Lenape companion planting.

And last year, after the tragic passing of a student, classmates grew lavender, lemon balm, and mint for the school’s crisis center, where scent was used to soothe grieving students.

Without support from community partners, Bianca says the garden would not exist for her Title One school.

“I’m not sure how we would fund the garden, let alone train future teachers as garden leaders without partners like GrowNYC...Our kids would miss opportunities to connect our garden to the wider world.” Before Covid-19, nutrition education programs were already lacking in forty four percent of all elementary schools citywide according to A Is For Apple, a study of nutrition education programming conducted by Teachers College in March 2018.

Cutting garden programs erases years of work by dedicated volunteers like Bianca, making it disproportionately harder for under-resourced schools to receive the free materials they rely on to keep gardens growing, furthering the gap in education inequality. It is vital that our elected leaders, foundations, and individuals invest in these outdoor learning labs and nutrition education programs now more than ever. The health and wellbeing of our city’s children depends on it.

Author: Kristin Fields is the Director of GrowNYC’s School Gardens program, a former high school English teacher, and the author of two novels. All opinions are her own.

GrowNYC COVID-19 Schedule Changes & Resources

June 29, 2020
Posted in GrowNYC

If there are changes to GrowNYC programming or operations due to COVID-19 this blog post will be information central for up-to-the-minute schedule changes.

GrowNYC Greenmarkets and Farmstands
Most Greenmarkets and some Farmstand locations are open and operating on schedule, changes to the schedule are listed below. Follow us on social media (links below) or GrowNYC's Union Square Greenmarket app for real-time updates about Union Square. 
*Collections at all food scrap & clothing drop-off sites are cancelled until further notice. For a list of food scrap drop-off locations and pick-up services, this list has been created by @ahealthyblueprint. To schedule a pick-up of textiles for a fee, please contact Wearable Collections. ​

Greenmarket Alternative Sales Directory
Many Greenmarket producers are offering a variety of ways to purchase their products, from allowing customers to pre-order and pick up at a market, to direct home delivery and shipping products from their online stores. All of that information is available in one place at GrowNYC Greenmarket Alternative Sales Directory 2020

CLOSED GREENMARKETS & FARMSTANDS:
Greenmarket at the Oculus
Bowling Green Tuesday & Thursday Greenmarket
Brooklyn Borough Hall Thursday Greenmarket
City Hall Park Tuesday & Friday Greenmarket
Staten Island Ferry Tuesday & Friday Greenmarket

Food Scrap Drop-Off and Clothing Collection 
Collections at all GrowNYC food scrap & clothing drop-off sites are cancelled until further notice.
Sign up for Food Scrap Drop-Off Alerts
Read our blog post - How to Keep Composting in NYC during COVID-19

GrowNYC Fresh Food Box

Open

Lenox Hill Neighborhood House: Tuesdays, 2:30 pm - 6:30 pm.
Courtesy Hour (for customers at higher risk of infection): 1:30 pm - 2:30pm

 

Project H.O.P.E.: Wednesdays, 2:00 pm – 6:30 pm

 

Uptown Grand Central: Wednesdays, 3:00 pm – 7:00 pm

 

District 5: Thursdays, 3:30 pm - 6:30 pm OPENING SEPTEMBER 3
Seasonal

 

East Harlem Health Action Center: Thursdays, 2:30 pm - 6:30 pm.
Courtesy Hour (for customers at higher risk of infection): 1:30 pm - 2:30pm

 

Bed-Stuy (at Mt. Lebanon Baptist Church, 228 Decatur Street):
No longer accepting new participants; join our waitlist
Saturdays, 11:00 am - 3:30 pm.
Courtesy Hour (for customers at higher risk of infection): 10:30 am - 11:00 am

 

Hunters Point South (at Center Blvd and 51st Avenue)
Saturdays, 11:00 am - 2:00 pm
August 22 - November 21

Suspended Hunter College
Brooklyn Army Terminal
1 Centre Street
Department of Health

Student and Adult Tours and Field Trips 
All scheduled adult market tours and DOE school field trips are officially cancelled until further notice

GrowNYC Farmer Assisstance
POSTPONED: Farmer Assistance La Nueva Siembra Business Training Course
CANCELLED: Eastern New York Farmworker Master Class and Blueprint Racial and Social Justice Training at Soul Fire Farm

GrowNYC Wholesale
GrowNYC Wholesale (formerly Greenmarket Co.) is operating and providing wholesale distribution to our customers and partners.

Follow us on social media or the app for real-time updates:
GrowNYC Facebook // Instagram
Union Square Greenmarket Daily List of Producers in Attendance // Union Square Greenmarket App
Manhattan Greenmarkets Facebook // Instagram
Queens Greenmarkets Facebook // Instagram
Brooklyn Greenmarkets Facebook // Instagram
Staten Island Greenmarkets Facebook // Instagram
Fresh Food Box Facebook
Farmer and Producer List and Social Media Links

GrowNYC Statement of Solidarity Against Racial Injustice / Declaración de Solidaridad Contra la Injusticia Racia

June 19, 2020
Posted in GrowNYC

Change starts within. We hear the voices of the many who are coming together to cry out for long overdue corrections to unfair systems that too often and for too long have resulted in loss of income, opportunity, liberty, and life. GrowNYC does not want to pay lip service to concepts critical to our collective survival like justice, equality, police reform, and the end to systemic racism. We want to effect real and lasting change from within.

We say as an organization that Black Lives Matter.

We are committed to listening to and working side by side with our BIPOC colleagues to determine what comes next, and to developing an action plan to build, change, and grow our organizational culture. Accountability is key. We are pledged to:

  • Evaluate actions and resources that increase opportunity, reach, and services for internal and external stakeholders
  • Develop goals and metrics to measure that progress
  • Diversify our Board of Directors and staff in decision-making positions
  • Create a values statement and action plan with the help of a facilitator
  • Ensure that all staff and board have undergone anti-racism/anti-bias training
  • Create accountability guidelines
  • Examine and expand GrowNYC’s programmatic service delivery for greater equity
  • Engage in open conversations

In solidarity,
GrowNYC

***

El cambio empieza dentro de nosotros. Escuchamos las múltiples voces de quienes se están uniendo para clamar por correcciones muy atrasadas a los sistemas injustos que, con demasiada frecuencia y durante demasiado tiempo, han dado lugar a la pérdida de ingresos, oportunidades, libertad y vida. GrowNYC no quiere darse a la palabrería respecto a los conceptos críticos para nuestra supervivencia colectiva como son la justicia, la igualdad, la reforma policial y el fin del racismo sistémico. Queremos efectuar un cambio real y duradero desde dentro.

Declaramos como organización que las Vidas de los Negros Importan.

Estamos comprometidos a escuchar y trabajar hombro a hombro con nuestros colegas del BIPOC (Negros, Indígenas, y Personas de Color) para determinar lo que viene después, y a desarrollar un plan de acción para construir, cambiar y hacer crecer nuestra cultura organizativa. La rendición de cuentas es clave. Nos comprometemos a:

  • Evaluar las acciones y recursos que aumenten las oportunidades, el alcance y los servicios para los interesados internos y externos;
  • Desarrollar metas y métricas para medir ese progreso;
  • Diversificar nuestra Junta Directiva y el personal en puestos de toma de decisiones;
  • Crear una declaración de valores y un plan de acción con la ayuda de un facilitador;
  • Asegurarnos de que todo el personal y la junta hayan recibido entrenamiento en anti-racismo y anti-prejuicios;
  • Crear directrices de rendición de cuentas;
  • Examinar y ampliar la prestación de servicios programáticos de GrowNYC para una mayor equidad;
  • Participar en conversaciones abiertas;

En solidaridad,
GrowNYC

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