Join Us for Grow for Change: A Benefit for GrowNYC

September 22, 2022
Posted in GrowNYC

Join us for an intimate night supporting GrowNYC with a fabulous 3-course meal and cocktails by Gotham, live music, and sparkling conversation all in a classic New York setting.

We'll celebrate Grow's 50+ year history of working block by block across the five boroughs to improve quality of life for all people. We'll honor Bank of America, a keystone funder in our work to launch NYC's first all-local food hub in the South Bronx in 2023, and for helping us add 860 learning gardens in NYC public schools.

New York City is better for bustling Greenmarkets, buzzing community gardens, conservation resources like composting and rainwater conservation, and education for all ages that fosters environmental stewardship.

As we turn the page to a new chapter in NYC, let's celebrate the real work we do together to make ours the greatest city in the world.

 

White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health

September 20, 2022
Posted in Greenmarket

On September 28th, the Biden-Harris Administration will host the White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health, with the goal of ending hunger and increasing healthy eating and physical activity by 2030, so that fewer Americans experience diet-related diseases like diabetes, obesity, and hypertension.

Conference Details and Agenda

From www.health.gov --

"Millions of Americans are afflicted with food insecurity and diet-related diseases—including heart disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes—which are some of the leading causes of death and disability in the U.S. The toll of hunger and these diseases is not distributed equally, disproportionately impacting underserved communities, including many Black, Latino, Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander, and Native American communities. And hunger and diet-related diseases affect many more communities, including rural communities, people with disabilities, older adults, LGBTQI+ people, military families, and military veterans.

Lack of access to healthy, safe, and affordable food, and to safe outdoor spaces, contributes to impacting hunger, diet-related diseases, and health disparities. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated these challenges further.

On September 28, 2022, for the first time in over 50 years, the Biden-Harris Administration will host a White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health. The First White House Conference on Food, Nutrition, and Health had a significant influence on the country’s food policy agenda for half a century. Now, again, we have the collective opportunity to chart a course for the future.

The Administration has set a goal of ending hunger and reducing dietrelated disease by increasing healthy eating and physical activity in the U.S. by 2030. This ambitious goal would mean that no Americans go hungry and fewer Americans experience diet-related diseases like diabetes, obesity, and hypertension. At the Conference, the Administration will announce a bold national strategy that outlines steps the federal government and other stakeholders will take to achieve this goal."

To end hunger and increase healthy eating and physical activity to reduce diet-related diseases and disparities, the Biden-Harris Administration has specified areas of action in five pillars:

1. Improve food access and affordability: End hunger by making it easier for everyone — including urban, suburban, rural, and Tribal communities — to access and afford food. For example, expand eligibility for and increase participation in food assistance programs and improve transportation to places where food is available.

2. Integrate nutrition and health: Prioritize the role of nutrition and food security in overall health, including disease prevention and management, and ensure that our health care system addresses the nutrition needs of all people.

3. Empower all consumers to make and have access to healthy choices: Foster environments that enable all people to easily make informed healthy choices, increase access to healthy food, encourage healthy workplace and school policies, and invest in public messaging and education campaigns that are culturally appropriate and resonate with specific communities.

4. Support physical activity for all: Make it easier for people to be more physically active (in part by ensuring that everyone has access to safe places to be active), increase awareness of the benefits of physical activity, and conduct research on and measure physical activity.

5. Enhance nutrition and food security research: Improve nutrition metrics, data collection, and research to inform nutrition and food security policy, particularly on issues of equity, access, and disparities.

The White House wants to hear your stories and experiences with hunger and/or diet-related diseases. Share Your Story here.

 

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