GrowNYC Schedule Changes Due to Inclement Weather

December 9, 2021
Posted in GrowNYC

If there are changes to GrowNYC programming or operations due to inclement weather this blog post will be information central for up-to-the-minute schedule changes. Inclement weather in the city or in the greater region does affect markets; markets may close early, or farmers may not be able to make it into the city.

Individual Greenmarket webpages list daily farmer attendance by opening hour the day of the market. Bookmark your market and check it before heading out the door.  

Monday, January 17
Union Square Greenmarket 
CLOSED due to weather impacting the greater region. There will be no market or food scrap collections. 

Follow us on social media for real-time updates:
GrowNYC Facebook // Instagram
Union Square Greenmarket Facebook // Instagram
Manhattan Greenmarkets Facebook // Instagram
Queens Greenmarkets Facebook // Instagram
Brooklyn Greenmarkets Facebook // Instagram
Staten Island Greenmarkets Facebook // Instagram
Fresh Food Box Facebook
Farmer and Producer List and Social Media Links

GrowNYC Appointed to Food Policy Transition Team for Mayor-Elect Adams

December 7, 2021
Posted in GrowNYC

We are proud to share some news!

Angela Davis, GrowNYC's Director of Retail Food Access and Agriculture, GrowNYC Board Member Liz Neumark, founder and CEO of Great Performances, beloved NYC catering and creative arts company committed to environmental stewardship and social responsibility, and Mark Izeman, Senior Attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), have all been selected to serve on the food policy transition team for Mayor-elect Adams. 

Transition teams are comprised of "experts, advocates and leaders committed to working together to improve New York City and prepare the Adams Administration to deliver for New Yorkers on Day 1." 

See below for the full press release, issued by the office of the Mayor-elect. 

*****************************************************************************************************************************

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: evan@pythiapublic.com and (917) 715-9265

Adams Transition Announces Members, Committees

New York, NY -- Mayor-elect Eric Adams’s transition organization announced its committees and members today, unveiling a diverse, talented group of hundreds of experts, advocates and leaders committed to working together to improve New York City and prepare the Adams Administration to deliver for New Yorkers on Day 1.

Many of the transition committees have been working and collaborating over the last month since Adams was elected to conduct City agency reviews, identify and interview candidates for key appointments, and develop policy priorities. The full list of transition committees and members can be found here on the Adams transition Web site. New members are still being added as work continues.

“This unprecedented collection of great minds and hard-working New Yorkers will prepare my administration for success because they represent the many backgrounds and views of our great city, and they are committed to working together toward its bright future,” Mayor-elect Adams said. “Each committee has been tasked with a specific set of goals and responsibilities to ensure we are ready to lead on Day 1. If we are going to tackle the many challenges in front of us as a city, the advocacy, nonprofit and business worlds must all be at the same table, working in collaboration--and that is exactly what this transition is doing. And the transition of this city to a safer, healthier, more prosperous New York will continue after January 1st—so I hope to continue to lean on this group of experts and advocates after I have taken office.”

The Adams transition is led by United Way of New York City CEO and President Sheena Wright and nine co-chairs who represent the breadth of diversity and talent in New York City, including top leaders from the worlds of government, labor, business and advocacy. Katie Moore is executive director of the transition. Meaghan Brown is chief operating officer.

###

 

Indigenous Peoples Heritage Month

October 30, 2021
Posted in GrowNYC

In recognition of Indigenous Peoples Month, we're highlighting those who inspire us every day to learn more about Indigenous foodways and environmental practices. 

Learn more: 

  • Munsee Three Sisters Medicinal Farm
    Vincent Mann of the Ramapough Lenape people spoke at the 2019 Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Working Group conference. You can read his remarks and the backstory of the tribe's struggles in New Jersey, as well as a recent story highlighting the Munsee Three Sisters Medicinal Farm which he founded.
     

  • Iroquois White Corn Project
    The Iroquois White Corn Project puts the aspirations of the Haudenosaunee people at the heart of the project; by passing on cultural wisdom to future generations; ensuring healthy, culturally appropriate food is produced sustainably; and contributing to the health and well-being of the community.
     

  • I-Collective 
    The I-Collective is a group of indigenous chefs, activists, herbalists, and knowledge keepers who work to create new dialogue that preserves historical indigenous traditions and promotes community resiliency. Their multimedia cookbook A Gathering Basket was released this year.
     

  • Gather Film 
    A film about the movement of Native Americans to reclaim their spiritual, political, and cultural identities through food sovereignty, while battling the trauma of centuries of genocide. Available for streaming. 
     

  • NDN Collective
    NDN Collective is an Indigenous-led organization dedicated to building Indigenous power. Through organizing, activism, philanthropy, grantmaking, capacity-building, and narrative change, NDN Collective is creating sustainable solutions on Indigenous terms. Required Reading: Climate Action and Indigenous Solutions is a roadmap, published by NDN Collective, that hones in on why Indigenous peoples must lead through the heart of the climate crisis. 

Run the New York City Marathon with GrowNYC

August 23, 2021
Posted in GrowNYC

GrowNYC is excited to participate in the 2021 TCS New York City Marathon as an Official Charity Partner for the first time! This year, the marathon will take place on November 7, 2021.

The NYRR Official Charity Partner Program offers an opportunity for nonprofit organizations to raise funds to support their missions and services. Participating charities can offer guaranteed entry to runners who fundraise on their behalf.

Right now, we are able to offer guaranteed entry to the marathon to a limited number of runners, provided they:

1. Cover their own registration fee

2. Raise at least $3,000 for GrowNYC by October 15, 2021

This offer is open to our community. If you are interested in participating, please complete this submission form. We will be reviewing submissions on a rolling basis until we have filled all open spots on our team.

Please share this opportunity with anyone who might be interested!

Visit our grownyc.org/marathon to learn more, and contact Bea Mora at bmora@grownyc.org with any questions.

 

Doctor's Orders!

August 11, 2021
Posted in Greenmarket

Two health insurance companies partner with GrowNYC to promote healthy eating among their members. 

Healthfirst recognizes that poor diet, a prominent risk factor linked to death and disease in the United States, is modifiable, and the health insurance company has partnered with GrowNYC to allow Medicaid and Medicare members to spend benefits (about $150 per month!) at our Greenmarkets, Farmstands, and Fresh Food Box sites on fresh fruits and vegetables.

Similarly, MetroPlus, another insurance company here in New York, is incentivizing healthy eating by providing Greenmarket Bucks (for use at GrowNYC food retail sites) to its members who have certain diet related illnesses.  

These programs, both focused on the connection between health and diet, are lauded at GrowNYC, where we work to provide access for all New Yorkers to healthy, fresh food while simultaneously promoting regional agriculture.  

Perhaps more health insurance companies will be inspired to launch similar programs, moving us closer to a health care system that integrates healthy habits for members and, by promoting local food, for the environment. 

 
Here’s a link for more information about GrowNYC’s partnership with Healthfirst, and here you will find further details on Greenmarket Bucks for MetroPlus members

NYS Regional Food Hub Breaks Ground

March 30, 2021
Posted in GrowNYC

Three cheers!!! 

Last week, GrowNYC broke ground on the New York State Regional Food Hub (the Hub), a 60,000-square-foot cold-storage facility in the Bronx. 

The Hub will dramatically expand our wholesale distribution infrastructure that makes high-quality, local foods accessible to underserved New Yorkers through wholesale buyers, including institutions and restaurants, and through innovative partnerships with nonprofit organizations. It will also create quality jobs all while strengthening rural communities by supporting New York State farmers. 

The new food hub will work with a range of small- and mid-sized farms, providing unprecedented access to New York City’s wholesale marketplace. The processing facility will also assist Upstate producers and processors in targeting institutional and private sector procurement opportunities. This first-of-its-kind, publicly funded food hub dedicated to supporting regional farmers will serve as a model throughout the country.

Here's a link to the press release for the Groundbreaking, and here's a Q&A with more information about the project. 

GrowNYC FreshConnect Information Session

January 28, 2021
Posted in GrowNYC

GrowNYC is happy to announce our Spring 2021 Training Series!

This free training is available to nonprofit organizations and community groups interested in operating a food box or farm stand in their neighborhoods. Organizations are invited to join us for an informational session on April 6 from 4-5 PM. This overview will help organizations determine which model is the right fit for them. We will provide general FreshConnect background, details about ordering produce through GrowNYC Wholesale, and highlight the differences between a farm stand and a food box. The info session is not required, but if you're still deciding if you'd like to run a farm stand or a food box, this will help you understand the differences and make your decision.

All training sessions are remote via Zoom.

April 20 from 4-5 PM, Farmstand Training 
April 23 from 4-5 PM, Fresh Food Box Training 

Register for our first information session here.  

GrowNYC Virtual Seasonal Job Fair March 31

January 28, 2021
Posted in GrowNYC

Every day, GrowNYC employees see first-hand the impact they have on the environment and the lives of New Yorkers in all five boroughs. We’re a non-profit organization founded 50 years ago, and we operate farmers marketsFarmstands, Fresh Food Box sitesfood scrap collections, and more.

We hire many seasonal staff starting in the early spring.

If you are interested in working for this dynamic organization to provide fresh food for all and reduce New York City's carbon footprint, join our job fair and meet our team!

At the GrowNYC Virtual Seasonal Job Fair, you will meet staff from each of our programs, hear more about seasonal jobs available at GrowNYC, and get a chance to ask questions about working with GrowNYC.

GrowNYC Seasonal Job Fair
Wednesday, March 31
6-7pm
FREE event, please register here.

Job Requirements:

  • We are looking for early-risers who can work outside in various weather conditions and lift heavy equipment.
  • Age 18+
  • Available May - November, including weekend days

Additional Skills Valued (but not required):

  • Proficient in languages other than English
  • Valid New York State Drivers license, and an interest in driving in NYC

GrowNYC positions (seasonal and otherwise) and Greenmarket farm and farm stand job opportunities are posted here: 
GrowNYC job opportunities and Greenmarket farm and farm stand job opportunities.

 

GrowNYC Celebrates Black History Month

January 27, 2021
Posted in GrowNYC

GrowNYC Celebrates Black History Month

February 2021 marks the 45th annual Black History Month. To close our month-long observance of Black History, we happily feature some of the incredibly hardworking and talented staff that make up GrowNYC. Get to know:

  • Tutu, Greenmarket Youth Engagement Coordinator
  • Diante, GrowNYC's Executive Assistant
  • Chantel, Garden Coordinator
  • Akhmose, Fresh Food Box and Greenmarket Team Member

All share their thoughts and experiences as Black individuals navigating environmental and food access spaces, including challenges they have faced.

Tutu Badaru 

Please introduce yourself and describe what you do at GrowNYC.

Tutu Badaru, she/her are my preferred pronouns. I identify as an African woman who was born and raised in Kampala, Uganda. I moved to New York seven years ago to go to grad school and was only supposed to stay for two years. However, somewhere in those two years, I fell in love with the city and its people, so I decided to stay. 

Getting a job at GrowNYC was one of the reasons I decided to stay. I was lucky enough to find a job that combined my professional expertise with my life’s passions. In my role as the Greenmarket Youth Engagement coordinator, I am part of a team that creates a learning environment in our Greenmarkets where students K-12 can engage with locally grown food and its growers. Our fun, interactive Greenmarket School Tours help children gain an understanding of farming in our region and how their food choices impact their bodies, their communities, and their environment.

Do you have certain passions that drew you to your current work?

I have always wanted to work with children. At first, I thought that would be as a pediatrician. However, when my high school Home Ec. teacher introduced me to the field of dietetics, I knew that was exactly what I wanted to do. I was and still am fascinated with the human relationship to food- one that is often underrated but so vital for our survival as a species. 

The American clinical nutrition field is made up of mostly white women, a fact that I was ignorant of before I started grad school. My nutrition program was not an exception to the national demographics. Therefore, in many of my classes, the few BIPOC bore the burden of pushing back on repetitive microaggressions and stereotypical misconceptions that our classmates had about communities of color. Cultural (non-white) foods and norms were often villainized and touted as the reasons for poor health indicators in black and brown communities. No one was talking about the systemic structures which intentionally kept BIPOC in areas with little access to fresh and healthy food. This was before the notion of Food Apartheid became more commonplace. 

So, I turned to Community and Public health nutrition as a way of opting out of a field that did not see BIPOC through a holistic lens. The system was broken and stacked up against folks who looked like me.  I realized that I wanted to be able to work with people and communities outside of the restrictions and limitations of Hospital regulations.

Who are the heroes that you look to in your work?

Dr. Jessica B. Harris for her work on documenting African American food pathways. She was a food writer during times when very few black and female writers were appreciated. I think her work to document the connection of black food in America to its African roots fills a vacuum in American food history. 

Yewande Komolafe, a Nigeran professional chef who just joined the elite ranks of the New York Times food writing staff. Yewande has used her platform to champion African food and bring food like Jollof rice to a wide audience. I think and hope that the more folks interact with cultures outside of their own, the less likely they are to be prejudice. Her appointment to such a mainstream food platform makes me feel like there is room for me too, an African girl from Kampala! Can you feel how excited I am for the future of food?

What are the challenges and opportunities particular to Black members of the environmental or food access space?

There are not enough black or brown people with decision-making roles in the food access space, especially in non-profits that work in communities that are predominantly BIPOC. I find it hard to think that any sustainable work can be done without centering the folks who are most affected and giving them a real voice. I can see glimpses of change in some of these spaces, but not enough to enact real change. 

What would this work look like in a more equitable society?

Food work is often underappreciated and the people who choose careers in it are often poorly compensated. Many black folks who work in this field do so as a sacrifice and in service to their communities. This sometimes means that people who want to do this work are not able to because they cannot afford to make the economical sacrifice. I think the food and nutrition field would be more diverse if we compensated black farmers, chefs, educators, and nutrition professionals more adequately.
 

Diante Webb

Please introduce yourself and describe what you do at GrowNYC.

My name is Diante Webb and I am GrowNYC’s Executive Assistant. I work mostly behind the scenes to support our Board of Directors, CEO, Assistant Director, and everyone else on staff! I schedule meetings, take minutes, draft agendas, plan events, and handle all kinds of administrative tasks.

Do you have certain passions that drew you to your current work?

I’ve always cared about the environment and wanted to learn more. I also love supporting and being a resource for people. So, I think that’s how I ended up where I am.

Who are the heroes that you look to in your work?

My heroes are Black activists, organizers, and everyday Black people working to make this City, State, and Country a better place for everyone. 

What are the challenges and opportunities particular to Black members of the environmental or food access space?

Environmental justice often excludes discussions of environmental racism, which perseveres and disproportionately affects Black people in the United States. We cannot achieve true environmental justice until the most vulnerable populations are acknowledged, accounted for, and protected.

What would this work look like in a more equitable society?

I think this work would include more perspective from and elevation of members of affected communities and their needs. In a more equitable society, grassroots organizations, communities, elected officials, and many more would work together to address the systemic issues behind food access, climate change, and environmental racism.
 

Chantel Kemp

Please introduce yourself and describe what you do at GrowNYC.

Hiya, my name is Chantel Kemp, and I am a Garden Coordinator at GrowNYC. A large part of what I do involves maintaining relationships with community members. The other parts include a weird juggling of corporate structure, earth warrior goddess mode, and navigating NY virtually. The members that I serve are some of the most beautiful souls, and for a long time, NYCHA has been underrepresented and undervalued. The residents of NYCHA have more value than a lot of NY residents see, my work in urban agriculture shines a light on that injustice. 

Do you have certain passions that drew you to your current work?

I have a passion for financial freedom and not having to sacrifice my morals to get it. When I first learned about the Urban AG Industry, I was receiving a stipend. $500 doesn’t do much when you’re struggling to pay bills, however, my saving grace was looking at the job potential and mobility. Salary positions that didn’t rely solely on academia, the AG industry valued my lived experience in a way the academic circles did not. 

Who are the heroes that you look to in your work?

My heroes are the young folks who choose Urban Ag for Summer Youth work. The young people who make the decision every day to support the earth and BIPOC freedoms. The teachers who center their work around equity and BIPOC voices. Last but certainly not least, my heroes are the beautiful POC women, men, and people who paved the way for me. 

What are the challenges and opportunities particular to Black members of the environmental or food access space?

There’s a pain for BIPOC folks in the environmental/green job sector. For the last 100 years or so POC folks have been suffering from some of the most violent forms of environmental terrorism. Mass and egregious pollution in black and brown communities, zero regulations or enforcement for housing standards or carbon emissions. The actual building of an expressway in communities already facing high rates of asthma and a lack of oversight of food corporations in black communities. So, the black and brown people that do the work in this sector are revolutionaries. Fighting not only for the earth’s existence but for the existence of our people on this planet too. #BlackLivesMatter 

What would this work look like in a more equitable society?

In a more equitable society, there would be major investment poured into urban communities through the creation of green jobs, training programs, internships, job shadowing opportunities, etc. There would also be space for economic mobility using a cooperative business model, and investment in creating an Innovation sector in NYC. Re-envisioning our NYC schools and replacing policing and regulations that undermine with more investment in social services, counselors, job training, trade skills, and healthier/tastier food options. Then we could foster and solidify relationships with schools and residents to build a better NYC and NY state.
 

Akhmose Ari-Hotep

Please introduce yourself and describe what you do at GrowNYC.

Greetings, my name is Akhmose Ari-Hotep. I started out at Grow as a Driver and Compost Coordinator then transitioned to the role of teamwork at Fresh Food Box and Greenmarkets. Presently and as of late I have been doing work with BIPOC and the Racial Equity Task Force (RETF).

Do you have certain passions that drew you to your current work?

I am an ‘Earth Steward,’ I am for equity, freedom, and restitution, I am ‘Captain Planet.’

Who are the heroes that you look to in your work?

Hazel M. Johnson, Dr. Robert D. Bullard, Domingo Morales, Ron Finley

What are the challenges and opportunities particular to Black members of the environmental or food access space?

Challenges: The reclamation of education, need for better access to resources, the need for more acknowledgment of our contributions to the field/s, participation in managerial roles, and policymaking. 

Opportunities: To innovate, lead, and still succeed in the face of continued adversity.

What would this work look like in a more equitable society? 

“40 acres and a mule.” Reparations!






 

GrowNYC COVID-19 Response

October 17, 2020
Posted in GrowNYC


COVID Safety Restrictions Update as of June 18, 2021:

GrowNYC has updated our COVID-related safety protocols across Greenmarkets, Farmstands, and Fresh Food Box sites in accordance with new guidelines from the CDC and New York City and State Departments of Health.

Vaccinated individuals are no longer required to wear masks and social distancing will no longer be enforced. GrowNYC no longer regulates touching/handling produce.

Individual farm businesses may set their own safety requirements; please read signage at stands.

All concerns regarding this policy should be addressed to GrowNYC management via email at info@grownyc.org.


Since the coronavirus pandemic hit New York City, GrowNYC has responded swiftly to the needs of our community.

Deemed essential businesses, we quickly reconfigured our 80+ food access sites to keep them open and safe for shoppers, producers, and staff. ​We are working with community partners to deliver free Fresh Food Boxes to low income New Yorkers who are undocumented, unemployed, or struggling in high need neighborhoods. Additionally, we have been building out distance learning resources to continue to support educators and the general public as learning spaces move remote.

For 50 years now, GrowNYC has been a resource for all New Yorkers who want to improve quality of life and protect the environment. You can continue to rely on us for access to fresh food, education, green spaces and more.

GrowNYC Greenmarkets, Farmstands, and Fresh Food Box Sites Map and Schedule

GrowNYC's 80+ open-air Greenmarket locations, Farmstands, and Fresh Food Box locations are crucial to the 250 regional farmers and producers who sell through them, as well as to the hundreds of thousands of New York City residents who rely on the them as an essential source of fresh, healthy food.  Eighty-five percent of our farms report that they would not be in business if not for the ability to sell directly to New York City shoppers.

As always, SNAP/EBT is accepted at all GrowNYC Greenmarkets, Farmstands, and Fresh Food Box locations. 

*Some Food Scrap Drop-off Sites are re-opening. See our Compost Program page for updates.

*Some Clothing Collections at Greenmarkets are re-opening. See our Clothing Collection Program page for updates. To schedule a pick-up of textiles for a fee, please contact Wearable Collections

Farmers Markets are Essential Businesses

Farmers markets are open as essential retail busineses while New York State is on P.A.U.S.E. 

GrowNYC Schedule Updates 

View real-time updates on market closures and GrowNYC program schedule changes, and follow us on social media.

Fellow Farmer - Pre-Order and Delivery

Fellow Farmer is a platform that allows customers to pre-order from the farmers market for pickup, or schedule a home delivery. 

Learn more at Fellow Farmer

COVID Guidelines - Market Safety for Shoppers 

We encourage you to please adhere to the following safety protocols to protect yourselves, your fellow shoppers, and our Producers and their employees. 

  • Masks Welcome & Encouraged
  • Unvaccinated Individuals: Masks Required
  • ​Individual Market Stands May Require Masks
  • If you are sick, stay home

Emergency Food Resources

Information about free meals, food pantries, SNAP enrollment, cash assistance, Medicaid, and food delivery assistance available here.

Additionally, GrowNYC is working with community partners to deliver free Fresh Food Boxes to low income New Yorkers who are undocumented, unemployed, or struggling in high need neighborhoods.

Distance Learning Activities and Resources

Due to school closure and social distancing measures, our Education Programs are currently not operating our Zero Waste and Food & Nutrition programs in schools, School Garden workshops and giveaways, Greenmarket tours or Teaching Garden field trips. In the meantime, we've developed a Distance Learning resource page for educators, families, and students of all ages, including our Virtual Teaching Garden, where you can keep up with planting and projects at our Teaching Garden at Governors Island and explore related activities you can do at home.

Recent Press

Bklyner, Food Carts and Trucks Struggle While Farmers Markets Soldier On Under Coronavirus Conditions
Bloomberg, Farmers Markets are a Lifeline to Growers Hurt by Coronavirus 
Boston GlobeCoronavirus Should Shift Our Focus to a More Locally Sourced Food Supply
Brookings Institute, Farmers Markets are Vital During COVID-19, but They Need More Support
CBS New York, Coronavirus Update: NYC Farmers Markets Open With New Safety Guidelines
Eater, NYC’s Farmers Market Can Be a Calming Oasis of Socially Distanced Grocery Shopping
Food & Wine, How to Shop Safely at the Farmer's Market During the Coronavirus Pandemic​
GoopUnion Square Greenmarket
NBCFood Sellers Enforce Social Distancing to Protect Shoppers
NY1How Food Markets Adapt Amidst the Coronavirus Pandemic
Pix 11How to Keep Social Distancing at Farmer's Markets
Secret New YorkMost NYC Greenmarkets are Still Open, Here are Their Rules for Shopping Safely
Staten Island AdvanceStaten Island Greenmarkets to Remain Open with Precautions in Place
TelemundoMercados al Aire Libre en NYC Siguen Ofreciendo Servicio Pese a Cuarentena
The New York Times, Why Outdoor Farmers' Markets Matter More Than Ever
Time Out New YorkNYC Farmers Markets Stay Open with Strict New Social Distancing Protocols

GrowNYC Needs Your Support 

For nearly 50 years, GrowNYC has made it easy for New Yorkers to take everyday actions that benefit the environment. Serving over 3 million New Yorkers every year, our programs encourage all citizens to lead mindful lives, like eating seasonally and locally, conserving resources, and preserving green space. Please consider a donation of any amount, we need your support now more than ever. 

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