Greenmarket

Wholesale Greenmarket Opens for 2015

The Wholesale Greenmarket is now open for the 2015 season! Buy fresh, affordably-priced plants, flowers, and produce direct from farmers from New York State and New Jersey.

The market is open from Tuesday to Saturday, 2am-8am: the early morning hours are tailored to buyers such as food retailers and restaurants, but the Wholesale Greenmarket is open to the public. Whether you are a business owner or a home gardener, a community organization or just cooking for a big family, join us bright and early for great deals on produce and plants in wholesale quantities.

290 Halleck Street (at Viele Ave)
Open Tuesday through Saturday
April 4 – Dec 31, 2015
2 AM to 8 AM

Please note that mainly plants are sold from April-June, with produce starting in July. Please see the Wholesale Greenmarket page for individual farmer contact information.

Watch GrowNYC Executive Director Marcel Van Ooyen's TEDx Talk

Watch GrowNYC's Executive Director Marcel Van Ooyen take to the stage to deliver a TEDx talk about scaling up local food distribution through Greenmarket Co., New York City's first and only food hub dedicated to supporting regional food producers by making their products available to wholesale buyers throughout the city.

 

Greenmarket Winter Weather Schedule Changes

Inclement weather in the city or in the greater region does effect markets;  markets may close early, or snow-bound farmers may not be able to make it into the city.

No anticipated changes.

Get real-time, up-to-date information on our Facebook pages: 
Union Square Greenmarket Facebook
Manhattan Greenmarket Facebook
Queens Greenmarket Facebook
Brooklyn Greenmarket Facebook 

 

Heritage Wheat in the Hudson Valley

GrowNYC & Greenmarket's Regional Grains Project, in partnership with NOFA-NY and The Culinary Institute of America invite you to join us for Heritage Wheat in the Hudson Valley, Saturday, February 21 at the Danny Kaye Theatre in the Conrad Hilton Library on the campus of the CIA in Hyde Park, NY.

The afternoon will feature a consumer preference tasting of heritage wheat from the Value-Added grains variety trials at 2 pm, followed by a panel discussion at 3 pm on the history of grain production in the Hudson Valley, the science underlying the culinary functionality of heritage grains, and how we can use these breeds to address health and wellness issues and environmental imperatives.  Panelists include: Steffen Schneider, farmer at Hawthorne Valley Farm, Maureen Costura, anthropolgist and food historian at the CIA, and Elizabeth Dyck from the Organic Growers Research and Information-sharing Network (OGRIN) and will be moderated by Chris Loss from The Culinary Institue of America. 

Tickets are $10 for the general public and free for CIA students with ID.

February is Local Spirits Month!

February is Local Spirits Month at SingL Lounge
 
GrowNYC’s Regional Grains Project is co-hosting a month long tasting series on Tuesday evenings in February at SingL Lounge. SingL Lounge’s popular two year-old Tuesday tasting series run by Master Sommelier Roger Dagorn will spend the month highlighting distilleries making their spirits with local, Northeast-grown grains.

Tickets are $25 and include samples of three spirits and snacks. There will be two tastings per evening, the first at 6:30 pm and then again at 7:15 pm. The tastings will offer attendees the opportunity to learn about the distilling process of each spirit directly from the distillers, as well as how these distillers are helping to spearhead the current renaissance of grain growing in the region. Staff from GrowNYC will also be on-hand to discuss the organization’s Regional Grains Project and sell a selection of local grains. 

Tickets are available on Eventbrite here. Proceeds from the tastings will benefit GrowNYC’s Regional Grains Project.

February is Local Spirits Month
SingL Lounge & The Fourth Restaurant
132 Fourth Avenue at 13th Street
Tuesdays in February
6:30 pm & 7:15 pm
February 3 – Orange County Distillery
February 10 – Breuckelen Distilling
February 17 – Hudson Whisky/Tuthilltown
February 24 – NY Distilling Company

Greenmarket Holiday Schedule Changes

Due to the upcoming holidays, there are several changes to the Greenmarket schedule. 
If a market is CLOSED, there will be no food scrap collections and/or textile recycling. 

Monday, December 29
Union Square Greenmarket (Manhattan) OPEN

Tuesday, December 30 
Brooklyn Borough  Hall Greenmarket (Brooklyn) OPEN
Bowling Green Greenmarket (Manhattan) OPEN
Staten Island Ferry Whitehall Greenmarket (Manhattan) OPEN

Wednesday, December 31
Union Square Greenmarket  (Manhattan)  OPEN
Dag Hammarsjkold Greenmarket(Manhattan) CLOSED, food scrap & textile collection cancelled
Bartel-Pritchard Greenmarket (Brooklyn) CLOSED

Thursday, January 1
Bowling Green Greenmarket (Manhattan) CLOSED
Tucker Square Greenmarket (Manhattan) CLOSED
Columbia University Greenmarket (Manhattan) CLOSED, food scrap & textile collection cancelled
Brooklyn Borough Hall Greenmarket (Brooklyn) CLOSED, food scrap & textile collection cancelled

Friday, January 2
97th Street Greenmarket (Manhattan) OPEN
Staten Island Ferry Whitehall Greenmarket (Manhattan) OPEN
Union Square Greenmarket (Manhattan) OPEN

Deck the Halls - Christmas Trees + Holiday Wreaths at Greenmarkets

Get your locally grown Christmas trees, wreaths, and boughs from a local farmer. A list of markets where you can stock up on holiday greens follows:

Durr Wholesale: Wreaths (Union Square, Saturday) 
Fiori Di Fenice: Wreaths (Union Square, Saturday) 
Floral Beauty Greenhouse: Douglas fir trees (57th St, Wednesdays, Saturdays; Columbia, Sunday; Jackson Heights Sunday - plants only)
Keith's Farm: Organic trees and wreaths (Union Square Wednesday, Saturday)
Lebak Farms: Wreaths (Grand Army Plaza, Saturday)
Mountain Sweet Berry Farm: Wreaths and princess pines (Union Square, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday)
Rexcroft Farm: Trees, wreaths, garlands (Dag Hammarskjold, Wednesday; Fort Greene, Saturday) 
River Garden: Dried flower wreaths (Union Square, Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday)
Stokes Farm: Herb wreaths (Tucker, Thursday, Saturday; Union Square, Saturday)
Trumansburg Tree Farms: Trees and wreaths (Union Square, Wednesday, Friday (12/19 only) and Saturday; Grand Army Plaza, Saturday)
Van Houten Farms: Trees and wreaths (Union Square, Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday)

 

Greenmarket Schedule Thanksgiving Week

It's almost our favorite food holiday, THANKSGIVING, and the markets are abundant with all of the ingredients you need for a delicious meal. We will have some schedule changes to accomodate shopping schedules, see below.  

*Market days with an asterisk mean it's a special market, rescheduled to Tuesday or Wednesday, normally held on a Thursday or Friday, so that customers have an opportunity to shop for Thanksgiving ingredients. Textile & food scrap collections closed at rescheduled markets. 

Wednesday 11/26:  Please shop early; markets may close early due to the inclement weather.
97th Street open *Wednesday 8am-2pm. Compost & textile collection cancelled.
57th Street open 8am-5pm.
Astoria open 8am-3pm. Last day for the season.
Bowling Green Greenmarket: open *Wednesday 8am-5pm. 
Bartel Pritchard Square - Closed due to inclement weather.
Bowling Green open *Wednesday 8am-5pm. Compost & textile collection cancelled.
City Hall Park Open *Wednesday 8am-4pm.
Dag Hammarskjold Plaza open 8am-4pm, compost & textile collection 8am-3pm. 
Grand Army Plaza Open *Wednesday 8am-4pm. Compost & textile collection cancelled.
Mount Sinai open 8am-5pm, compost & textile collection 8am-2pm. Last day for the season.
NY Botanical Garden open 9am-3pm. Last day for the season.
Tribeca open 8am-3pm, compost & textile collection 8am-1pm. 
Tucker Square: Open *Wednesday 8am-5pm.  
Union Square Wednesday open 8am-6pm, food scrap collection 8am-5pm.

Thursday 11/27 & Friday 11/28:
All Greenmarkets closed. No textile or food scrap collection.

Saturday 11/29 & Sunday 11/30
Regular schedule.

The Greenmarket Experience at the Hyatt Union Square

GrowNYC recently released The New Greenmarket Cookbook by Gabrielle Langholtz, a collection of one hundred seasonal recipes from today’s top chefs and culinary minds. In light of this exciting occasion, Hyatt Union Square New York is celebrating its neighbor with The Greenmarket Experience. Guests who book this experience package will receive a robust sampling of, and introduction to, what this beloved green oasis in the heart of Manhattan has to offer.

Guests will receive:

  • A Greenmarket Wheat Beer from Brooklyn Brewery, which is grown from 70% New York State-grown wheat and barley
  • A $20 shopping credit to use at the Greenmarket throughout their stay,
  • A Hyatt Union Square New York canvas bag to tote their loot, and
  • A guide featuring interesting background on GrowNYC and its vendors.
  • The New Greenmarket Cookbook.

This package has been carefully curated to demonstrate the hotel's alignment with the GrowNYC initiatives, which include supporting family farms, farmers, markets, gardens, recycling, and education.

Talkin' Turkey

Do you have any idea what goes into raising a turkey? When talking about the birds that have become so synonymous with this time of year, we realized we didn’t know much, either. Luckily, we have access to some of the best turkey farmers in the region, so we rushed right over to Zaid Kurdieh of Norwich Meadows Farm and Maria Quattro of Quattro's Game Farm to learn exactly what goes into raising the centerpiece of many Thanksgiving tables.
 
For Quattro’s Game Farm, everything starts from the egg. They keep their favorite birds from the past year and mate them, selecting the eggs that will go on to be the next year’s Thanksgiving turkeys. The eggs are then incubated, hatched, raised, and processed on the farm. Norwich Meadows Farm also raises and processes on the farm, but buys their turkeys when they’re poults, getting them when they’re newly hatched and raising them from there and from what we’ve heard, raising turkeys is a lot of work. A friend of Zaid’s warned him when he first started to raise turkeys that “a turkey in its first few weeks of life is just looking for a place to die.” Sounds harsh but, in fact, during those first couple of weeks, the farmers have to keep a constant eye on the poults – ensuring they eat their food, making sure they don’t drown in their drinking water, and preventing them from commingling with the chickens. Unfortunately, even with keeping a constant eye on them, a lot of them still won’t make it. This year, Zaid started with around 190 poults and will be processing around 140. 
 
After four weeks, the critical time for a poult has passed and the turkeys are much more independent, although the farmers can’t relax too much. Turkeys are feisty creatures that have a herd mentality and have been known to take down electric fences without too much effort, electric jolts and all. Plus, heritage breeds and wild turkeys fly (domestic ones, not so much). Not far, mind you, but they still fly. It is for this reason that Zaid only raises domestic turkeys. He doesn’t want his turkeys to fly off his property and onto a nearby road where they could get hit by a car. Quattro’s raises domestic, heritage, and wild turkeys but they also have a lot of property and are not as worried about them getting hit by cars. They do, however, end up picking them up from neighboring farms fairly regularly. In fact, on the day we spoke with Maria she told us the heritage turkeys had once again made their way onto their neighbor’s farm and her father had gone to retrieve them. I guess we can’t blame the birds for wanting to spread their wings a little bit! 
 
After they've hatched and lived through the early weeks, eaten well, roamed freely while avoiding colliding with a car or being eaten by a predator and are generally speaking, happy and healthy, it’s time for processing and delivery to New York City Greenmarkets. Both Quattro’s and Norwich Meadows have on-farm processing and control the process from start to finish. Quattro’s is a much larger operation than Norwich Meadows and raises around 400 turkeys so it can sometimes take a few days to finish processing them all. Norwich Meadows processes far fewer turkeys but they are also Halal, so only Zaid can process the turkeys. It takes him at least a day to get through all of them. Then comes the plucking, the cleaning, and the packaging. 
 
As you can see, there is a lot of hard work that goes into raising and processing each of these birds but it is all worth it for these farmers so you can have the best tasting bird out there on your table. The turkeys Greenmarket farmers sell you have lived healthy, well-fed, wandering-outside-in-the-sunshine kind of lives, and they undoubtedly taste better for all of those reasons. Plus, it’s pretty great to know that the turkey you enjoy on Thanksgiving was raised and processed by the same person that sold it to you. You can ask the farmers questions about exactly how the turkeys were raised, what kind of food they ate, and even hear fun stories about the turkeys roaming (or flying) free and they’ll know the answers. When you buy directly from a local, family farm, you know they care and want the best not only for their turkeys but also for their customers.
 
We’d be remiss to leave out how Zaid and Maria celebrate Thanksgiving on the farm. Zaid takes one of his birds to his sister’s house, where she cooks it the traditional method by roasting it in the oven. Turkey isn’t too common in Middle Eastern culture (Zaid’s mother is American and his father is Palestinian), but they still eat it once a year on Thanksgiving. Maria’s grandmother, Carmella (the owner of the farm), has cooked Thanksgiving turkeys for years so it’s just second nature to her. She stuffs the turkey and roasts it. One thing she doesn’t do? Brine her turkeys. Maria explained that the salt in the brine gets into the meat and masks the natural flavor of the turkey. “If you’re paying for these delicious turkeys, why would you want to hide the flavor?” Maria asked. 
 
As we all sit down with our family and friends to celebrate around nature’s delicious fall bounty, let us all remember to be thankful for our farmers and the hours they toil each year to bring us city dwellers fresh, delicious, healthy food. We’re also pretty grateful we’re not going to get a call from the neighbor during dinner to come pick up a wayward flock of turkeys!
 
For more information on our Greenmarket turkey producers, visit our Turkey buying Guide here.

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