GrowNYC Fresh Connect Food Box Funding & Training Opportunities

February 20, 2020
Posted in GrowNYC | Tagged Fresh Food Box

GrowNYC is happy to announce our Spring 2020 Fresh Food Box Training.  This free training is for nonprofit organizations interested in operating their own Fresh Food Box wholesale buying club for fresh, high-quality, local foods at below-retail prices. Customers pre-order bags one week in advance on the designated distribution day, and the next week pick up their Fresh Food Box share. Each share contains 6-10 seasonal fruits and vegetables, as well as information on how to store and prepare the produce they’ve received.

This training will cover:

  • How to source farm-fresh foods in wholesale volumes via Greenmarket Co., GrowNYC's local food distribution program
  • GrowNYC's Fresh Food Box best practices that can be adapted to meet the needs of your community
  • Resources including manuals, order guides, and recordkeeping documents to help you operate a successful Food Box site

In order to operate a Fresh Food Box, organizations need the following capacity:

  • 6-10 staff hours per week (for distribution, program administration, promotion, and bookkeeping)
  • Accessible distribution location with good foot traffic
  • Storage space for equipment (folding tables, tents, etc.)
  • Some organizations may be eligible for $10,000 in funding from the New York State Department of Ag and Markets to support the operation of your Fresh Food Box site. For more information, click here.

If your organization or community group meets the above capacity guidelines and wishes to operate your own food box, please join us!  Please kindly fill out the google form.

GrowNYC's Fresh Food Box Funding & Training Opportunities
Tuesday, March 24th 
1:30 PM - 5PM

GrowNYC Celebrates Black Farmers, Agriculturalists, Chefs, and Advocates

February 5, 2020
Posted in Greenmarket

In the Foreword to Monica White’s book Freedom Farmers: Agricultural Resistance and the Black Freedom Movement, LaDonna Redmond writes, “The contributions of people of color and indigenous nations are missing in our understanding of food history. Our legacy has been erased.”

For Black History Month, GrowNYC will highlight partner organizations and people working to present a counternarrative, inclusive of the history and invaluable contributions of black farmers, agriculturalists, chefs, thinkers, and food advocates.

FOOD

Edna Lewis is a clear standout among our farm-to-table heroes here at GrowNYC. She was a fervent champion of GrowNYC’s Union Square Greenmarket and of using local ingredients. In fact, in her cookbook In Pursuit of Flavor, published over 30 years ago, Lewis references some of our farmers that still come to sell at Union Square today. It would be impossible to discuss the history and inestimable contributions of black chefs and thinkers without acknowledging Edna. She is perhaps the most famous, but other unsung black culinary pioneers, like Flora Mae Hunter and James Hemings, are beginning to receive the recognition they deserve.   

The granddaughter of a former slave, Edna Lewis published her first cookbook nearly five decades ago, and ever since she’s been teaching people all over the world to love the flavors of the South.  

She once wrote, “Greens are a dish that most Southerners would walk a mile for.”  

This week, we spoke with Kia Damon, who, like Edna Lewis, is an avid cook who moved to New York City from the South.  Although Kia is only in her mid 20s, she’s electrified the NYC culinary world.  And Edna Lewis is one of her heroes, too.



GrowNYC
:  What are you doing in the food universe these days?

KIA:  Right now, I am the Culinary Director at Cherry Bomb Magazine. I used to be an executive chef, but I’ve shifted gears a little bit and now dabbling in food media. Within my job there is a whole lot that I do and a whole lot that I have yet to do just because it’s a very new position It’s a  still blossoming brand and media group.  Right now I spend a lot of my time recipe testing for our next cookbook, trying to do great community work, and making the job interesting. 

GrowNYC: When you were on a panel at MOFAD about Edna Lewis last year, you mentioned you have a tattoo of Freetown on your arm.  Is that a nod to Edna?

KIA: Oh absolutely. I said to my friend in Florida who did my tattoos, “can I get a quick little something?” He’s like, “What do you want?”  “Just Freetown, Edna Lewis’ birthplace, on my arm. Hahahha.”  He said, “you want to do Freetown, Virginia?” But I didn’t want that.  Then everyone would think I was from Virginia.  Just like everyone think’s I’m from Detroit because I have a ‘D’ on my arm for my last name.  I feel like just the word ‘Freetown’ in itself invokes really good feelings in me, especially when things get difficult. It just feels good to look at it. It brings me back to where I was when I got it, so that I can remember why I do the work that I do. 

GrowNYC: What is it about Edna Lewis that you admire?

Kia: For a lot of Black folks, American and otherwise, we go a while before we see other people in the food world (or other people’s respective industries) that we can reflect ourselves in. I grew up watching Food Network and Cooking Channel shows. I felt like those chefs were great, but none of what they did seemed attainable because innately I knew that that wasn’t my story, those aren’t my circumstances or privileges. Then I came across Edna and I was like, “ooh!”  Here was this very tall, wise-looking, gentle-looking woman making phenomenal, delicious food, and food that seemed very relatable. And not relatable in the sense of food that people project onto African American communities, but just food that was really good. Food that I felt I could and that I wanted to make. And the way she highlights and cooks with the seasons…The first time I heard of ‘farm-to-table’ was from a Chef’s Table episode – I was like, “Oh wow. I want to do this.”  And then I read about Edna and she was doing this from way, way back. Then I’m like, “wait a second, we were all doing this way, way back.” 

GrowNYC: We are all about the seasonal--and regional--cooking here at GrowNYC.  Do you incorporate this into your work?

Kia: Yeah.  Well, more so in Florida. I spent time interning on a farm and working on a farm.  I was growing microgreens and feeding the animals. In Florida, it was easier to work with the seasons. I worked at a farm and I worked a restaurant that used the produce from the farm. It was very community oriented.  Since I’ve been in New York, I’m still trying to get a grasp of what the hell is in season and what the growing periods are and, really, what’s going on.  Now that I’m out of the restaurant I will probably have more time to talk with farmers and speak with communities, and to have my own garden, and get back into it. Honestly, that’s where I feel the most together.  If I’m not cooking, I want to have my hands in some soil-- being able to literally sow seeds, and put love and care into them.  To see the thing grow and then nourish you, it’s the most basic and fulfilling cycle. It just hits you really deep.  It’s something that really puts me in tune with myself and with past & present. A great feeling.

GrowNYC:  I’ve noticed that you often talk about community in interviews. Why is that?

Kia: Being from the South and then coming to the North, where things are much more fast-paced, the way community looks and works is a little different. I feel like it’s a lot harder to find that sense of community. Even though everyone is hanging out, I feel like it’s harder to do work that feeds back into other people as it feeds back into me.  I am trying to do work where I can meet people face-to-face. Being seen all the time, I feel like who I actually am has started to become invisible. It becomes difficult to talk to people because the only thing they can interact with is the person they’ve projected me to be from what they’ve seen on the Internet or these other spaces. I really can’t keep up in that way,  and my only default is to just retract from it all. Then I end up isolated.  So now I am like, how do I break away from that? I’m going to talk to people face-to-face, and I’m going to be side-by-side with people, whether it’s in the dirt or with the crops or at the restaurant or whatever.  I know things don’t look the same as they did when I was home, and I know I can’t change that.  So, how can I change the way I interact so that I can still find that sense of community.  I am devoted to the people and to the community. Not in a weird superficial way, but with authenticity. And I’m still searching to find it. 

GrowNYC: I wonder if Edna Lewis every felt something similar, coming up from the South. If you could talk to Edna and ask her just one question, what would you ask?

Kia: Wow. If I could ask Edna Lewis anything…?  No one has ever asked me this before. I would ask her what she envisioned when she decided to leave Virginia and go to NYC. Was she doing it for other people or was she doing it for herself?  I would love to know what she saw for the future of food.

Learn more about Kia via her Instagram @kiacooks and @cherrybombe 

LAND

To put the extensive contributions of black farmers, agriculturists, and chefs in perspective, consider the Pigford v Glickman Lawsuit of 1997.

In 1920, there were nearly a million black farmers in the United States. That number plunged over the years due to decades of racial discrimination and the unlawful denial of loans to black farmers by the USDA. In 1997, black farmers in the South filed a federal class action lawsuit, seeking to end this legacy of bigotry – and they won.  Pigford vs. Glickman was settled in 1999. It was a followed by another suit, Pigford II, which was settled in 2010.  Although the settlements reached into the billions, they are just a tiny drop in the bucket.  This 2019 article from the New Food Economy discusses the inadequacy. In addition to payout problems is the fact that the settlements resulting form the Pigford lawsuits deal only with relatively recent claims of discrimination resulting in refusal of loans and even foreclosure, “and none stretching back to the period of the civil-rights era, when the great bulk of black-owned farms disappeared.”

Today, black farmers (1.3% of total number of farmers in the US) own just 0.52% of our farmland. 

LaChaun Moore took GrowNYC’s Whole Farm Planning course in 2018 in preparation for a move to South Carolina to cultivate organic naturally colored cotton for her “farm to textile” venture. We recently asked LaChaun a few questions about her work and her influences. In her thoughtful response, LaChaun reflects on this notion of the land, dating back well before the Civil-Rights era.

GrowNYC: Is there a particular agriculturist, grower, chef, historian, etc. that influenced you? 

LaChaun: There are quite a few, however, what has inspired me throughout this journey is my ancestors-- the generations within my family as well as the many black bodies that were captured during the transatlantic slave trade. My grandfather was my first introduction to agriculture. He and his five brothers were sharecroppers. I grew up hearing stories about how they had to steal away in the night to escape the Jim Crow South by pushing their car in the dark dead of night with the engine off until they made it to the main road where they took off to Philadelphia. They did this to avoid waking their sharecrop overseers who, in that era, were next of kin to slave masters. My grandfather never farmed again, but when he ultimately settled in New Jersey he tended a beautiful vegetable garden on a plot next to his home. As a child, I was so amazed when he pulled carrots out of the ground. I believe that the garden represented a piece of the past that he held close to him.

GrowNYC: Cotton is such a beautiful plant with such a violent history here in the United States. What kind of reactions do you get when you tell people about your project?

LaChaun: This is a great question, but it is difficult to answer because each person's experience will differ depending on who they are, where they come from and their personal circumstances and surroundings. For me, the South is full of energy, and that energy varies from place to place. For instance, I live in a very small rural community in an unincorporated city called Pineland, located in Lowcountry South Carolina. It is further inland but the Sea Islands known for the Gullah Geechee culture is no more than an hour away. The most recent census says the area is 90% African American. Everyone that lives around me knows each other and is related in some way. That being said, about 20 minutes from where I live is a confederate flag monument. This represents the racial climate that is often covert. I haven't faced or witnessed any atrocities in my interactions, but I can attest to the lack of development and resources in the overall South--specifically how it affects rural black communities. The expression poverty is expensive is very real in the rural South, whether it be paying a premium for necessities like utilities and internet (which many people don’t have) or traveling for an hour or across state lines for a minimum wage job. The cost of living is low but the absence of opportunity is high. The lack of infrastructure has made it difficult to create generational wealth that can lead to independence and development within these communities.

The land that I live and work on was passed down through the generations from the Rivers brothers who were former slaves. Therefore, everyone living on the land is related and they collectively own it and the houses on the property. This is the reality for most rural southern communities. Although this is ownership there is very little development other than housing. The history of this land is one not to be confused with a plantation. I say this because many people make that assumption. Plantations still exist, however, because they have so much land they are being converted into "private spaces" such as golf courses. This is problematic for several reasons but mainly because they keep the plantation aesthetic. These plantations are located in rural areas so they provide jobs, but these are hospitality jobs which, given the race and class structure of the South, eerily echo the past. I’ve given these examples with hopes to convey the complexities and juxtapositions throughout the rural South that makes trying to pinpoint what land, property and agriculture “means” difficult. 

When we talk about farming and working the land, specifically in the South, the stigma left by slavery still exists. However, I get the sense that native southerners' relationship to these stigmas is different than those who’ve moved up north generations ago. Seeing cotton fields isn’t an oddity in the South. Many black Baptist churches are on land that grows cotton. Cotton decor is a staple in many southern homes, although what it represents in a black home differs from the very popular plantation aesthetic. I have certainly experienced aversion from people when talking about cotton but mostly before I moved down South. Many people were warning me about the South and how dangerous it was and that the connotation of growing cotton as a black person was problematic. It was incredibly disappointing and discouraging in the beginning, but I didn't give up and I kept researching. Eventually, I learned about naturally colored cotton. Hundreds of varieties of cotton still exist today and it is believed that years ago there were thousands. Within those varieties are shades of cotton that grow in green, reddish-orange browns and even mauve pinks. Very few people know that cotton grows in colors other than white, let alone the history of the plants' origins. Cotton open pollinates, so naturally colored cotton can come from both cross-pollination over the years as well as manually cross-breeding plants. Crossbreeding is a skill that was brought to the US by the enslaved from West Africa whose efforts can be seen in various heirloom southern crops like rice varieties and sea island cotton. It is believed that slaves used it for cloth as well as medicinal purposes. Naturally colored cotton has a rich history in various Indigenous Latin American countries, however, in the US black slaves and native americans, were only allowed to grow it because plantation owners saw no value in it. The “value” has a lot to do with the fiber quality and genetics (which is why it still isn't commercially viable), however the correlation to the people that cultivated it is one not to be missed. Sally Fox is an Organic Bio-Dynamic naturally colored cotton farmer who has made a huge contribution to organic cotton farming. She bred her own variety of commercially viable naturally colored green and brown cotton called FoxFibre. On an episode of my podcast, she tells the history of naturally colored cotton, as well as her struggles developing and bringing it to market. If you are interested in learning more about naturally colored cotton, I highly suggest you give it a listen. 

This past year, on a small plot of land (less than a 1/4 acre) I grew Sea Island Brown Cotton (Gossypium Barbadense, native to South Carolina, crossbred by African slaves), Acadian Brown Cotton (Gossypium Barbadense, from rural French Cajuns in New Orleans, Louisiana), and Green Cotton (Gossypium Hirsutum, from Tututepec Oaxaca Mexico). I also grew Indigofera Suffruticosa that I sourced from a plantation in Charleston. This variety of indigo is the same variety that was a cash crop during slavery. Indigo carries the same painful history in South Carolina as does cotton through the South, However many descendants of the Gullah Geechee people use it as a symbol to honor their ancestors. This is what being a farmer and growing represents to me as well. The pain, trauma, and destruction that happened in this country are at the fault of the system created by the founding fathers and plantation masters alike, not at the fault of my ancestors. My work is not to aestheticize their pain but to honor it and use their strength and resilience as a motivation to build upon.

I understand where the aversion comes from and why it exists, but I don’t think it should act as a catalyst to deter Black Americans from agriculture. In fact, I believe the inverse, keeping black folks out of these systems allows the underbelly of the American financial system which was built on slavery to continue to re-invent itself. There is that saying the only way out is the way through. The South is our people's land, and in this country cotton and indigo are our people's crops. It saddens me to see how indoctrinated the vision of those who created these systems has lingered and continued to place obstacles in the journey towards empowerment through self-sustainability. I‘ve learned plenty on this journey; I’ve grown closer to myself, who I am and where I came from. When you do things consciously, they take longer, which is why I understand how difficult getting this project off the ground has been. But what I also know is that if my ancestors could make it through what they had to endure, then I know it is in my blood to push through as well.

Hear more from LaChaun on her podcast, Weave

GrowNYC Grains Annual Home Bakers Meetup Fundraiser

January 15, 2020
Posted in Greenmarket

Break bread with GrowNYC Grains and your fellow home bakers! Bakers of all experience levels are welcome to swap samples with fellow grain geeks and share secrets on how to get a really crusty crust. Some of New York City's best professional bakers will also be on hand to talk tips and techniques.

GrowNYC Grains Home Bakers Meet-Up
Monday, February 24
Project Farmhouse, 76 East 13th Street (at 4th Avenue), MHTN
6-9pm
Tickets here

Professional bakers attending:
Austin Hall (She Wolf Bakery) 
Alex Bois (Lost Bread Co.) 
Martin Philip (King Arthur Flour) 
Sharon Burns Leader (Bread Alone Bakery) 
Dan Leader (Bread Alone Bakery) 
Adam Leonti (Author of Flour Lab) 
Johanna Kindvall (Author of Smörgåsbord) 
Nora Allen (Mel the Bakery) 
Savannah Turley 
Reva Castillenti (Bread and Roses) 
Sarah Magid (Knead Love Bakery)

Other special guests attending:
Thor Oechsner (Oechsner Farms, Farmer Ground Flour, Wide Awake Bakery) 
Amber Lambke (Maine Grains) 
Amy Halloran (Author of The New Bread Basket)

Bring a loaf of your favorite home baked bread, made with locally-grown grains and flours, and copies of your recipe and/or starter to trade with others. 

Each ticket includes event entry and one drink.

Purchase grains and flours from the Greenmarket Grainstand at the Union Square Greenmarket on Wednesdays and Saturdays, and other locations listed here.

Visit our ONLINE AUCTION

About Our Auction
Your participation in our online auction will enable GrowNYC Grains to keep driving the growth of regional grains, a crucial component of our food system, in the Northeast. 
The auction ends at 9 p.m. on February 24th - the night of our Home Bakers Meet-Up! 

All proceeds benefit GrowNYC Grains. 

About GrowNYC Grains
GrowNYC Grains has acted as the essential value chain coordinator, convener, and market booster behind the resurgence of small grains in the Northeast, bringing cereal grains and other staple crops from the research stage to commercial distribution in the country’s largest consumer market, New York City. Small grains and other cover crops are the core of a functioning regional food system. They have lasting environmental and economic impact and give consumers nutritious and flavorful options in the marketplace. Our grains work underscores GrowNYC’s mission to provide essential services and take action to make NYC a place where every person can enjoy a healthier, more sustainable life.

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE

 

GrowNYC Chef Recipe Series

January 5, 2020
Posted in Greenmarket

January 2020 
Chef Laëtitia Rouabah of Benoit

Executive Chef Laëtitia Rouabah brings a wealth of knowledge of traditional French cooking, as well as her love for fresh produce, to a modernized Benoit, Alain Ducasse’s flagship restaurant in the heart of New York City.

Laëtitia inherited her passion for cooking--with an emphasis on highlighting the natural beauty of ingredients--from her mother and grandmother, which inspired her to study culinary arts at the Chamber of Craftsmanship in Versailles.

As Executive Chef at Benoit, Laëtitia stays true to the spirit of quintessential bistro fare, focusing on using fresh market ingredients and utilizing sophisticated techniques to showcase the best of French classics.

Recipes from Chef Laëtitia Rouabah
Corn Velouté, Crispy Lump Crab
Duck a l'Orange
Onion Soup
Profiteroles
Striped Bass

 

November 2019
Food Creative Mercedes Golip

Mercedes Golip grew up in Caracas and lived for many years in Miami before settling in New York. Her cooking style does not adhere to strict Venezuelan traditions, she creates dishes with classic foundations, reinvented and influenced by other cuisines — a metaphor for her life. As a creative and curious home cook, Mercedes loves spending long hours in the kitchen preserving and even planting her own food, she is also an experienced consultant and creative producer in the marketing world; casual food stylist, recipe tester and developer for media outlets and blogs. Mercedes hosts Venezuelan-inspired pop-up dinners and teach cooking classes to spread out the word about the food she loves. This project is highly driven and inspired by local producers and the amazing vegetables they grow. Currently Mercedes lives in Astoria. When she’s not behind a stove, you can probably find her looking for inspiration at farmers’ or flea markets, or planting herbs and heirloom tomatoes.

Recently, Mercedes developed an eBook, Arepas, A Colorful Story, a step-by-step guide on how to make colorful arepas with vegetable dyes. The eBook focuses on one color, covering other techniques with the hope to inspire readers go beyond. Find out more at Arepas Por Venezuela
IG: @IamBananista

Recipes from Mercedes Golip
Calabaza Soup with Sour Cream and Pomegranate Seeds
Turkey Corn Dumplins Shakshuka Style
Vegan Ceviche
Masa Cornbread
 

 

October 2019
Pastry Chef Sofia Schlieben of PRINT Restaurant 

PRINT Restaurant Executive Pastry Chef Sofia Schlieben is NYC born and raised. She wasted no time and started working from an early age for some of the city’s most decorated chefs. She has worked for Thomas Keller, Michael White and Jean Georges. Sofia became Pastry Chef at Michelin-starred Veritas, and then went on to become Corporate Pastry Chef for John Fraser’s Dovetail, NIX and The Loyal. She now joins PRINT and is incredibly excited to showcase her skills in such a thoughtful and seasonal restaurant.

Recipes from PRINT Restaurant: 
Brown Butter Madeleines
Shakshuka with Quail Eggs
Elephant Heart Mocktail 

 

 

September 2019 
Chef David Stample of In Cucina

We’re happy to kick off our Chef Recipe Series with Chef David Stample, who creates Southern soul food with spicy Caribbean flavor, a flavor palette he picked up from his Caribbean family.

Chef David currently serves as Creative Director and Resident Chef at In Cucina, an event space and cooking studio in the Flatiron district, and he has worked as the Culinary Director of CREaM (Culinary-Related Entertainment and Marketing), won first place in the 2015 Grace Jamaican Jerk Festival, and is a ‘Hunger Hero’ with the nonprofit No Kid Hungry. 

Beginning Friday Sept. 6th, come out to GrowNYC’s Union Square Greenmarket from 9 a.m. – 11 a.m. on Mondays and Friday throughout    September to see Chef David in action. 

Recipes from Chef David:
Watermelon Caprese Salad
Curried Cauliflower
Cantaloupe Salsa
Summer Squash & Corn Saute

 


 

 

Severe Weather Schedule Changes

December 18, 2019
Posted in Greenmarket

If there are changes to our operations due to inclement weather, this blog post will be information central for up-to-the-minute schedule changes.

Thursday, December 19th 
All Greenmarkets and the GrowNYC Norwood Farmstand are open. Farmer attendance will be limited, visit us on social media for details. 

Sign up for Food Scrap Drop-Off Alerts

Follow us on social media or the app for real-time updates:
Union Square Greenmarket 
Daily List of Producers in Attendance // Union Square Greenmarket App
Manhattan Greenmarkets Facebook // Instagram
Queens Greenmarkets Facebook // Instagram
Brooklyn Greenmarkets Facebook // Instagram
Staten Island Greenmarkets Facebook // Instagram
Fresh Food Box Facebook 
Farmer and Producer List and Social Media Links

Holiday Greenmarket Schedule

December 12, 2019
Posted in Greenmarket

Happy Holidays! Greenmarket farmers markets, Fresh Food Box locations, and food scrap and clothing collections have some schedule changes the week of Christmas and New Year's, see below.

All Fresh Food Box locations are CLOSED December 23rd - January 4th. 

Food Scrap and Clothing Collections Schedule Changes: 
Food scrap and clothing collections are the SAME for regular and rescheduled markets, UNLESS otherwise noted. ​
View a full list of food scrap collections schedule changes here.
View a full list of clothing collection schedule changes here.

GREENMARKET HOLIDAY SCHEDULE:
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 24th - Christmas Eve

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 25th - Christmas Day

  • All Greenmarkets CLOSED
  • All food scrap and clothing collections CLOSED

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 26th

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27th 

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 28th & SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29th 

  • All scheduled Greenmarkets and GrowNYC Farmstands are OPEN 

MONDAY, DECEMBER 30th

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 31st 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1st - New Year's Day 

  • All Greenmarkets CLOSED
  • All food scrap and clothing collections CLOSED

THURSDAY, JANUARY 2nd

FRIDAY, JANUARY 3rd

GrowNYC Farmstands Open for Winter

December 10, 2019
Posted in Greenmarket

Year-round access to fresh, local produce is central to the mission of GrowNYC's Greenmarket program. That's why we’re so happy to announce two wintertime access points in the Bronx, and one in Sunset Park, Brooklyn this year. 

GrowNYC’s Lincoln Hospital, Norwood, and 6th Avenue Sunset Park markets are converting to Farmstands for the winter months. The farmstands will sell vegetables, fruit, eggs, bread, regional grains, hot sauce, maple syrup, and honey, and will be open weekly. These markets will operate in addition to year-round GrowNYC Greenmarkets

SNAP and Health Bucks are accepted.

GrowNYC’s Norwood Farmstand
E Gun Hill Rd & Dekalb Ave, Bronx
Thursdays, 9am-3pm
In partnership with the American Heart Association.

GrowNYC’s Lincoln Hospital Farmstand
149th St between Park and Morris Aves, Bronx  
Fridays, 8am-3pm
In partnership with the American Heart Association.

GrowNYC's 6th Avenue Sunset Park Farmstand
6th Ave & 44th St, Brooklyn  
Saturdays, 8am-3pm 
Special thanks to Council Member Carlos Menchaca for his continued support of this GrowNYC Farmstand. 

                              

A Letter from GrowNYC

December 8, 2019
Posted in GrowNYC

Dear Community,

An employee of GrowNYC's FARMroots program recently received a demeaning, racist, and hurtful note in response to a newsletter acknowledging the important contributions made by Latinx individuals to US agriculture. I write today to firmly denounce this behavior, and unequivocally state that it has absolutely no place in our community.

As an organization that brings New Yorkers together across all of our programs, from Swaps to community gardens and our Greenmarkets, GrowNYC is appalled by the current level of comfort individuals have expressing hate speech. Moreover, we have the responsibility of ensuring our employees’ dignity, safety, and rights.

Accordingly, any member of our community who harbors racist or hateful beliefs like these should consider themselves unwelcome.

COMPLETE COMMUNITY GUIDELINES

There’s so much work for us to accomplish together in this incredible city of ours. Here’s to doing just that.

Marcel Van Ooyen
President & CEO
GrowNYC

Greenmarket Gift Guide

November 30, 2019
Posted in Greenmarket

Holiday gift shopping for the Greenmarket lover is made easy with this list of popular holiday gifts from Greenmarket producers. 

NON-FOOD ITEMS
Greenmarket Merch: Tote bags (many farmers also tell totes!), reusable produce bags, The New Greenmarket Cookbook, calendars
Greenmarket Tokens: Wooden tokens can be purchased in $5 increments at the information tent at any Greenmarket using a credit or debit card. Tokens can be used like money at most vendors. Out of town but want to purchase tokens for family and friends living in New York? Call our office at 212.788.7900 and ask about purchasing tokens. 
The New Greenmarket Cookbook: Available for sale at Union Square Greenmarket and various other markets, as well as on 
www.grownyc.org/cookbook.
Greenmarket Producer Cookbooks: 
The Fisherman's Wife by Stephanie Villani; Living Bread: Tradition and Innovation in Artisan Break Making by Daniel Leader
Soaps 
Sachets, Salves, Lip Balms, Lotions, and Body Oils by Lavender by the Bay 
Beeswax Candles from various honey producers
Yarn, Hats, Scarves from Catskill Merino and Rosehaven Alpaca
Herbal Tinctures, Teas, and Tisanes from Violet Hill Farm, Furnace Creek Farm, White Pine Community Farm, Tweefontein Herb Farm 

Wreaths
Decorative Garlic Braids from Keith’s Farm
Poinsettias, Paper Whites, and Orchids
Succulent & Cactus plants


FOOD GIFTS
Jams and Preserves
Artisanal Cheeses
Hard Cider
Beer and Spirits
 from GrowNYC's 
Craft Beverage Pop-up
Honey 
Wine
Herbal Tinctures, Fire Cider, Teas, and Tisanes
 from Violet Hill Farm, Furnace Creek Farm, White Pine Community Farm, Tweefontein Herb Farm 

Jerky and "Meat Lovers" Cured Meat Pack from Lowland Farm
Cookies, Pies and Baked Goods
Maple Syrup, Maple Cotton Candy & Maple Candies

Popcorn from Wildraft Farm and Oak Grove Plantation
Chicken Liver Bourbon Pâté from Yellow Bell Farms 
Soppressata and Cured Chorizo from Flying Pigs Farm
Duck Salami and Prosciutto from Hudson Valley Duck Farm
Egg Nog from Ronnybrook Farm and Ole Mother Hubbert 
Gluten Free Babka from Las Delicias
Spirits: Gin, Corn Whiskey, Vodka, Unaged Single Malt Whiskey from Orange County Distillery, 1857 Spirits and Hickory Ledges
Bison Jerky from Roaming Acres
Beer from From the Ground Brewery, including Pale Ale, Stout and Red Ale
Bitters from Violet Hill Farm
Dried & Smoked Chiles & Ginger from Eckerton Hill and Oak Grove Plantation, Lani’s Farm, Campo Rosso, Conuco Farms, Evolutionary Organics, Bradley Farm

Please note, not all of these items are sold at every market location so check the producer line-up to see what products are available at your local Greenmarket.

Handy Tips for a Sustainable Holiday

November 26, 2019
Posted in Recycling | Tagged recycle

 

Green Your Holidays

Making a list of how to green your holidays? Here are some of our favorite tips and events to cure the post-holiday blues.

Pre-cycle

Whether you're hosting a gathering or just giving and receiving, clearing out excess can make for a more sustainable holiday season.  Find new homes for unwanted items through clothing collections, coat drives, Stop 'N' Swap® events, holiday toy drives, or DonateNYC reuse partners--you'll have more room to celebrate, and an easier time recycling and reusing your post-holiday waste.

Sending cards?

Try e-cards or look for greetings made with recycled content (the more post-consumer content, the better).

Giving gifts?

Show some style when shopping by bringing your own reusable bags. Choose minimally-packaged items made with recycled content and give items that will be treasured, not thrown out before the next holiday season. Consider giving experiences, homemade, and vintage gifts. Find new joy in old favorites that are broken or need refreshing with Fixers Collective. Get hundreds of toy-free gift ideas for a more meaningful holiday here and here, and get great tips from Wired's review of the 5 Best Toys of All Time.  Remember to wrap it recyclable by using old newspaper, paper gift wrap, paper gift bags, or reusable bags and containers that keep on giving all year. 

Preparing a holiday meal?

Look for items in recyclable packaging and buy minimally- or non-packaged fresh produce, like that from Greenmarket. Get meal planning and food storage tips from Save the Food, and read a thorough overview of sustainable Thanksgiving meal planning.    Easily compost vegetable trimmings by using drop-offs at select Greenmarkets and other locations. Serve your masterpiece on reusable plates and offer guests reusable flatware, glassware, and napkins.  Prevent waste by making small changes such as using recyclable aluminum foil rather than plastic wrap for food storage.

Stuck with clean up duties?

Wrapping paper, gift boxes, cardboard, and other paper packaging can go out with other paper recycling (remove tape, ribbons, and other decorations).  Eggnog cartons, wine bottles, olive containers, cookie tins, and hard-to-open rigid plastic packaging are easy to recycle alongside the rest of your metal, glass, plastic, and cartons.  If your curbside recycling day falls on Christmas and New Year's Day, here's when to set out recycling, garbage, and organics (if participating).  Foam peanut packaging and plastic foam blocks are not recyclable, but alternative paper packaging can be included in your recycling pile.  Foam peanuts can be reused at select shipping centers and Manhattan Mailroom locations, and cornstarch peanuts can be composted.  For those so inclined, even corks can be recycled—find drop-sites here

Too many leftovers?

Save take-out containers to send guests home with another helping.  Check the shelf life of open and unopened food and get storage tips to make the most of food and create less waste at stilltasty.com.

Post-Holiday Recycling Events to Cure the Winter Blues

Recycle Your Tree.

If you're putting up a real tree for the holidays, plan to chip in at MulchFest!  Trees (cleaned of stands, lights, tinsel and ornaments) will be collected and recycled into mulch for NYC parks at designated sites from December 26, 2019 - January 11, 2020. Bring your own bag to chipping sites and take home mulch for your yard, garden or street tree. Find citywide drop-off sites and mulch pick-up locations here*. If you miss MulchFest, the city will pick up trees (also stripped of ornaments, etc) curbside from January 6 - 17, barring any snow disruptions. 

Recycle Unwanted Electronics.

Certain electronics are banned from disposal.  When upgrading or unloading electronics, many recycling options are available at no cost, including curbside pickup for homes in the outerborosFind more recycling resources here and check in with the Lower East Side Ecology Center, which runs the Gowanus E-Waste Warehouse in Brooklyn and hosts "After the Holidays" e-waste collections in all five boroughs.

Loosen Your Drawers.

Clear out ill-fitting, outdated and otherwise unwanted clothing, shoes, and linens and bring them to one of GrowNYC's weekly collections for reusable clothing and other textiles.

Swap Your Stuff.

GrowNYC's Stop 'N' Swap® is the ultimate re-gifting party. Bring reusable items to share (portable items only) or simply bring a tote bag or two to take home things you can put to reuse. Unstuff your home at one of two swaps in December, or find winter swap dates and locations at GrowNYC.org/swap.

 

From all of us at GrowNYC, thank you for helping green our city by taking our "recycling challenge" at community events, volunteering as an Environmental Ambassador, dropping off clothing and food scraps at our Greenmarkets, attending our Stop 'N' Swaps, and more throughout 2019. We look forward to seeing you out at many of the great recycling events that will kick off a sustainable 2020. Happy Holidays!

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