GrowNYC Programs -- Extreme Heat Weather Update

July 19, 2019
Posted in Greenmarket

GrowNYC Greenmarkets & Food Scrap/Textile Collections 

GrowNYC Greenmarkets are OPEN during the heat wave on Friday, Saturday, Sunday, July 19-21. Food scrap and clothing collections will be open as scheduled.

Some producers may call out and some may leave before closing time so be sure to shop early. And don't forget to hydrate hydrate hydrate!

Stop 'N' Swap

Saturday, July 20 - Concourse  CANCELLED DUE TO EXTREME HEAT
12pm-3pm, St. Simeon's Episcopal Church Outdoor Lot* (map) (flier
1020 Carroll Place, Bronx
*Outdoor event, subject to cancellation with inclement weather. Check website for updates. 

Sunday, July 21 - LES Chinatown POSTPONED DUE TO EXTREME HEAT
11am-4pm, Chinatown ADA Weekend Walk* (map) (flier
Mott Street between Pell Street and Bayard Street, Manhattan
*Outdoor event, rain or shine

Stay cool with this Peach and Arugula Salad from Kitchn

Peach and Arugula Salad

SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS

  • 8 ounces peaches (about 2 regular or 3-4 Saturn peaches)*
  • 5 ounces arugula*
  • 3 tablespoons champagne vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon honey*
  • 1/2 teaspoon whole grain mustard
  • 1 tablespoon minced shallot*
  • 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon coarsely chopped tarragon leaves*
  • Salt and pepper
  • 2 ounces ricotta salata, shaved or crumbled*
  • 1/4 cup toasted pistachios (optional)

*Ingredients available now at your neighborhood Greenmarket. 

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Cut peaches in half and remove pits. Thinly slice peaches and place in a large bowl with arugula.

  2. In a separate small bowl, whisk together vinegar, honey, mustard, and shallot. Slowly add the olive oil in a stream, whisking until emulsified. Stir in the tarragon. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

  3. Add dressing to peaches and arugula and toss. Divide salad between plates, sprinkle with ricotta salata and pistachios, and serve.

 

 

GrowNYC Grains at Slow Grains 2019

July 9, 2019
Posted in Greenmarket | Tagged Grains, Beer

Slow Grains 2019 - a bi-annual grain conversation, in partnership with GrowNYC Grains

Slow Grains is back! Join us for a dynamic conversation with leaders in the movement to bring small-scale grain growing back to the Northeast. Momentum around locally-grown grains is building – amongst brewers, distillers, bakers, chefs, and home cooks – our collective effort is creating a regional system of growing, processing, and distributing grains. Built into this movement is improved flavor, as well as on-farm diversification and resilience. Farm Breweries have generally lagged behind other sectors due to availability of barley, and limited capacity to malt grains grown in the region. In 2014 Brewers Choice became an event that showcased beer made with regional grains, malted in the northeast. Since then, 12 malting facilities have opened, the number of acres devoted to growing barley has tripled, the number of Farm Brewery licenses has increased by more than 450% and in 2019 the requirement to use New York State ingredients increased to 60%. And best of all, consumers are experiencing a golden era of delicious innovation in their favorite liquid form. Beer. Wow!

Come learn from the pioneering folks working on the Northeast local grain movement – we’ll share what we’ve learned, discuss grains varieties growing in our region, their important role in the building of a sustainable food system, and the infrastructure and distribution challenges involved in these efforts.

Join us on July 17 in Williamsburg, Brooklyn for this all-inclusive event with outdoor space, sunset views, live music, and a ton of beer tastings. The Slow Grains' panel discussion will precede the awesome Brewers' Choice 2019 event. Purchase of a ticket allows entry to the event. This year 20 small batch brewers will come together to celebrate local grains and malts with Slow Grains of Slow Food NYC!

WIth much gratitude to Beer Sessions Radio™ and the Good Beer Seal for hosting us at this, the 9th annual NYC Brewer’s Choice™, a featured event of July Good Beer Month.

Tickets are 21+ and over and are All-inclusive Food + Drink

Grown with Pride

June 7, 2019
Posted in Greenmarket

This month marks the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots and, essentially, the birth of the Pride movement in the United States. 

Since the opening of the first Greenmarket in 1976 at 59th Street and Second Avenue in Manhattan, GrowNYC has endeavored to create community spaces where everyone is welcome. At the Greenmarket, neighbors gather not only to buy fresh food, but to mingle and check in on each other. It creates a feeling of belonging; the composition of the many Greenmarket communities throughout the City reflects the invigorating diversity of NYC itself.

We are honored to count a number of LGBTQ Producers and stand workers among our farmer community.

Members of Transgenerational Farm, City Saucery, Moxie Ridge, and Rise & Root Farm have graciously shared with us their experiences as LGBTQ farmers, and every Tuesday during Pride Month, our Union Square Greenmarket publicity team will post one of their stories on the Union Square Greenmarket Instagram account.  

You can also read the unedited versions here on our blog. We’ll be updating it every week as they come in.

Our first Pride Month profile is with Jayne of Transgenerational Farm. Here’s the complete transcript:

GrowNYC:  How did you become a farmer?

Jayne: I come from a long line of conventional farmers in rural Kansas. My dad is a county extension agent, and as a kid my two older sisters and I were always involved in 4-H from ages 7-18.  I grew up in southwest Kansas where the prairies and wheat fields are so vast and flat you can see your dog run away for a week. My first jobs were working on local farms, and I learned how to drive a tractor before I could drive a car.

When I was a sophomore in college my uncle, a farmer, passed away from cancer most likely caused by conventional chemicals, and my family moved to the northeast part of the state to take over the farm. We grew conventional corn, wheat, soybeans, and beef cattle. I spent countless hours fixing fences, checking cows, cutting hay, tilling fields, and drilling grains. While I loved this work, and excelled at it, this was also the time that I was beginning to understand my feelings of gender dysphoria and starting down the long and difficult road of transitioning. I always felt like I didn't have a future in rural Kansas. While I had found a small and close trans family at college (Rock Chalk Jayhawk -- go KU!!) there were no trans farmers; people like me didn't exist in rural Kansas. So when I was offered a job with AmeriCorps in New York City, I jumped at the chance, hoping to find queer and trans community. I spent seven years in the city working at various non-profits and eventually found my way to GrowNYC where I worked as a Fresh Food Box coordinator. Being involved in food access and food justice and seeing the farms in the Hudson valley reinvigorated my passion for agriculture.

Suddenly I could see a future where queer people grew food for each other and worked the land and used our magic to nourish our community, and I wanted that. So I took the FARMrots program at GrowNYC, and then was accepted into the pro-farmer program at the Hudson Valley Farm Hub, where I am now in my third year. The pro-farmer program allowed me to make connections with Sustainability Farm through a mentorship program, and now I am co-stewarding land with them in Accord, NY, in the shadow of the beautiful Mohonk Ridge with clear slight of the Mohonk Mountain House, and a stone’s throw from the Rondout Creek!   

How long have you been a Greenmarket farmer and what is your experience as a part of the market community in NYC?

This is my first year selling at Greenmarket and I am EXTREMELY excited to be a part of the Greenmarket family. I have a long history with GrowNYC, and now to see that relationship come full circle and reunite as a producer feels like coming home!

How has your experience as a part of the LGBTQ community informed your experience as a farmer?

One of the main driving forces and philosophies in my work is the desire to connect people with agriculture who are traditionally excluded from it. As a rural queer I felt a lack of safety in my home rural spaces which ultimately left me to leave. LGBTQ people should know that we have a right to rural life as much as anyone.

****************************************************************************************************

Next, we heard from Michael at City Saucery.

GrowNYC: How and why did you start your business?

Michael: Back in 2010, our careers were going nowhere (our backgrounds are both in design--me furniture/interiors and Jorge with graphic design--so we're both very visual). At the time, my Italian mom, a native of Calabria (who is an artist in the kitchen), started cooking at a local restaurant and gained kind of a cult following, so we started cooking classes. Jorge and I would both organize and promote these events to get our minds off of our (then) aimless careers, and my mom would teach--people just loved her. One thing led to another and people started inquiring about the sauces that we would pair with the food my mom cooked. That inspired us to create more sauces. After operating out of a shared incubator for several years, and a short stint with a poorly managed co packer, we finally decided to take back 100% control and get our own facility. Luckily, we found one in South Brooklyn, and the country’s first Saucery was born. The idea was (and still is) to produce specialty food products with a modern twist since we are, after all, a modern family.

How long have you been a GrowNYC Greenmarket producer and what is your experience as part of the Greenmarket community in NYC?

This is our third season with Greenmarket, and it has been one of the best experiences we've ever had as producers. The platform we are so fortunate to access weekly has helped us gain significant brand awareness and a level of customer interaction wholesale could never provide.

How has your experience as part of the LGBTQ community informed your experience as a business owner/GMKT producer?

Well, as proud members of the LGBTQ+ community, we understand that money equals both freedom and sustainability, so we decided to start our own business to help navigate our future together as both business and life partners. I would never leave our future in the hands of politicians, and no member of the LGBTQ+ community should.

As producers, it’s fueled our creativity further by inspiring us to recreate what it means to be a pasta sauce honestly. The classic sauces are great so why touch that? It’s not our style or inspiration, so we produce a very familiar pantry item …but with a modern twist. This is why you’ll find very unique flavor profiles at our Greenmarket stand and never the classic sauces typically found in grocery stores that are produced for celebrity chefs and inaccessible restaurants. The American pantry needs some updating, and we’re here for it.

****************************************************************************************************

Third up in our Pride series is Lee Henessy.

Lee is the farmer and cheesemaker behind Moxie Ridge Farm. You can find him slinging cheese every Friday at GrowNYC’s Union Square Greenmarket.

This is what Lee has to say about finding happiness and selling at Greenmarket, as well as how the solitude he’s found while farming has helped him get in touch with who he is:

“I’m a first generation farmer, and I got into farming through sheer force of will. Before I was doing a lot of creative and corporate work. I hadn’t found happiness through trying to be successful, so I decided to focus on happiness first then work on the success part later. And that’s what brought me to goat farming.

I joined GrowNYC’s Union Square Greenmarket in August 2018. I’m a little bit fanboy about the Greenmarket because it is such an important and influential market. I was a little starstruck when I started to be selling with producers that helped to start it. It means a lot to me to be a part of this community -- in an emotional way but also as a point of pride, like ‘hey look, this little farm in Argyle NY with this crazy person who makes these ridiculous cheeses is standing shoulder to shoulder with these other producers.’ The market is also the backbone of my farm. It’s why I drive 3 hours and 45 minutes every Friday morning at 3am with my product that I have to pack up for an hour before I leave. I do it because it allows me the flexibility and support financially to make the types of cheeses and do the type of farming that I want to do.

I came out as bi when I was 19, and it was very recently, at 38, that I came out as a trans man. It wasn’t until I started farming and gave myself the space and support I needed running the farm that I was able to make some realizations about who I am. I’m not sure being trans or bi affects my farming more than any other part of me. What I hope people understand is that it’s more of the effects of living as a queer person in this world that affect my farming and business decisions. There’s a difference.

I can’t really say that being queer has affected my farming. I think good farmers are very individual. Being a bi, trans man has informed me as an individual, and that’s how I farm. That’s how I raise my animals, that’s how run my business. But I would say farming has affected my ability and strength to be out and queer in a weird way. It’s all connected somehow.”

****************************************************************************************************

For our final installment of this series during Pride Month, we talked to Michaela Hayes of Rise & Root Farm. Here’s what she had to say about farming as a member of the LGBTQ community:

Rise & Root Farm is in the Black Dirt region of Orange County, NY. We moved here from NYC in 2015 to start the farm. My wife Jane and I, along with our partners Karen Washington and Lorrie Clevenger, started the farm together. We all met through urban farming and community gardening in NYC. One of our farm goals is staying connected with our NYC communities, and being at GrowNYC’s Union Square Greenmarket is a big part of how we have been able to do that. Another way we stay connected is finding ways to bring people to the farm. We hold monthly community work days and lead tours. This year we've started hosting events, and on June 29th, we are holding a Farm Pride Tea Dance to bring together our farming and LGBTQ communities.

We're not afraid to do hard things - being gay and out where we live, being farmers, starting a business, running a cooperatively-owned farm that is interracial and intergenerational, gay and straight. Every step of the way we have chosen our path because we believe in it. We're proud to be who we are and to expand the representation of what farmers look like in the U.S. We started our farm in large part because of our commitment to social justice and our belief that everyone should have access to fresh, healthy, affordable food. We know we can't work that out on our own - we need widespread, systemic change to make this reality come true. Growing our farm in a way that models the world we want to live in is one way we contribute to that change. 

We picked the name Rise & Root Farm for a lot of reasons, but the visual that we need to root down while rising up runs deep with us. Our roots make us who we are - the communities we come from, the people who came before us that helped us walk our path, the activists who fought for our right to exist and have agency, the people who have taught us what we know, our families and our ancestors. Our roots are growing to include our new neighbors, other local businesses, our farmer neighbors, and our market community. These are the roots that we rely on to help us thrive.

We started out at Greenmarket with our sister fermentation business, Crock & Jar, in 2012 at GrowNYC’s Fort Greene Greenmarket. In 2015, we started selling at the Friday Union Square Greenmarket, where we have stayed since. The other NYC-based market you can find us at is La Familia Verde Farmers Market in the Crotona/E. Tremont neighborhood in the Bronx. 

Rise Up and Root Deep!

Greenmarket Schedule Changes for Independence Day

June 3, 2019
Posted in Greenmarket

Please note that that all Thursday GrowNYC Greenmarkets, and a couple of Friday markets, will be closed for the holiday. They are:

Thursday, July 4th 
•    Columbia Greenmarket 
•    Tucker Square Greenmarket
•    175th Street Greenmarket
•    Bowling Green Greenmarket 
•    Brooklyn Borough Hall Greenmarket

Friday, July 5th 
•    Fordham Plaza Greenmarket
•    Staten Island Ferry Greenmarket 

Wishing all of our Greenmarket shoppers a happy holiday!
 

Seasonal Jobs at GrowNYC

May 22, 2019
Posted in GrowNYC

GrowNYC Seasonal Jobs
Thank you for signing up for GrowNYC's Seasonal Job Fair. As a follow-up we want to make sure you have all the information you need to apply for a job with GrowNYC, our farmers, and/or our partners.

GrowNYC Job Opportunities
All GrowNYC job opportunities get posted here and more will be added in the coming months.

Greenmarket Farmers
Greenmarket farmers hire for their individual farm stands and on their farms. Listings are here and there's also a Facebook page.

GrowNYC Partners Seasonal Jobs
NYC Department of Health
The NYC Department of Health is hiring part-time Nutrition Educators, Culinary Educators, and Bilingual Educators (Spanish, Bengali, and Chinese speakers) to provide Just Say Yes to Fruits and Vegetables Stellar Farmers Markets (JSY SFM) nutrition education and food workshops at farmers markets serving low-income New Yorkers. The goal of JSY SFM is to increase consumption of fruits and vegetables by building knowledge and skills about healthy eating.
Stellar Farmers Markets Nutrition Educators
Stellar Farmers Markets Culinary Educators
Stellar Farmers Markets Bilingual Educators (Bengali, Mandarin/Cantonese, Spanish)
To receive more information, please email Margaret at mdunncarver@health.nyc.gov.

Wearable Collections
Wearable Collections is a NYC based company focused on keeping clothing, textiles and shoes out of landfills since 2004. We are seeking applicants who are self motivated,
team oriented, courteous and friendly to join our team. We are looking for individuals who enjoy being outside, have an attention to detail and are dedicated to customer
service.
Job listings are here. ​Please apply to info@wearablecollections.com with your resume/experience and specify which position(s) you are interested in. Must provide a brief description of why
you want to join the Wearable Collections team.

Plastic Cleanse Photo Contest!

April 7, 2019
Posted in Greenmarket

PLASTIC CLEANSE PHOTO CONTEST! Show us how you shop plastic-free at the Greenmarket (lots of tips here) and you could win this Ultimate Plastic Cleanse Kit for #zerowaste shopping, supplied by our friends at @packagefreeshop and @beeswrap In NYC alone, plastic bags generate about 1700 tons of residential garbage on a weekly basis. Join us in our annual plastic cleanse and inspire others to change this environmentally damaging habit! Take photos at market or at home of your plastic-free shopping, for a chance to be regrammed by us, and one lucky winner will receive the Ultimate Plastic Cleanse Kit!⁣ 

⁣Contest rules:⁣
-Take a photo and post it to your Instagram account of your plastic-free shopping supplies before heading to market, a plastic-free interaction at market, or of your plastic-free market haul after shopping. ⁣
-Tag @unsqgreenmarket and hashtag #GMKTnyc #PlasticCleanse to enter.⁣
-Dates to enter are 4/6 - 4/31/19. ⁣
-GrowNYC and Greenmarket staff, volunteers, farm staff, or farmers, or family members are not eligible to win.⁣
-Open to NYC residents. Contest ends at 11:59:59 PM ET on 4/31/19.⁣
-On 5/1/19, GrowNYC will pick 1 winner to win the ultimate Plastic-Free Shopping Kit!⁣ ⁣
This April, we’re taking our annual #plasticcleanse to another level with weekly events and guests who inspire us to live a more #zerowaste market lifestyle! Our takeovers, demos, and special events will all have an emphasis on wasting less in your market routine.

Caught Up in Kondo? Don’t Spark Joy in Landfills!

April 6, 2019
Posted in Recycling | Tagged swap, reuse, donate, recycle, reduce


Making up just 5% of the world’s population, the US consumes 30% of the world’s resources and creates 30% of the world’s waste.  We have so much stuff that finding a place to put it is big business; the self-storage industry is booming. Today, it is physically possible for every American to stand at the same time under the canopy of self-storage roofing in the US.  It’s no surprise, then, that Marie Kondo, author of best-selling book “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up,” has started a de-cluttering craze.

On her Netflix show, Kondo teaches clients to make their homes more livable through her special organizing process. The result is large piles of garbage bags filled with clothing, home furnishings, and other items that no longer “spark joy” for their owners.  Read on for tips to break free of clutter, sustainably! 

The true solution to too much stuff, of course, is to consume less, buy better, and care for what we already have—this makes it easier to maintain a comfortable home, and helps the planet too!  Next time you put your stuff on the curb, consider that for every garbage can placed out for collection, the equivalent of 71 garbage cans' worth of waste is created in mining, agriculture and other industrial processes to convert raw materials into finished products and packaging. 

Tips to Responsibly De-Clutter Your Life:

1: Clear it out.  To achieve the highest use for unwanted items, choose to swap or donate what’s usable.  For items such as electronics, household chemicals, and personal documents, check out local resources and special events to recycle or safely dispose.   Need a little extra help getting started? Check out How to Declutter Your Home Fast: A Checklist for the Messy.

2: Get organized.When you’ve successfully pared down, reorder your home for daily life.Good organization keeps you from buying things you don’t need or already own, and can create a happier, less stressful living environment.Check out 10 Ways to Unclutter Your Life.  

3: Change habits.To remain clutter free, slow the flow of new things into your home.  Prevent future waste buy buying wisely—choose high quality items you truly need and intend to use.  Try out zero waste practices like repairing what you already own and love,  (see Fixers Collective, Mend It Mondays, Fix It Fridays) and buying bulk and package-free groceries.  Spend less time shopping and managing stuff, and more time on non-commercial activities like enjoying culture, spending time in nature, and volunteering.

Want to stay on top of NYC zero waste news and resources? Subscribe to our monthly NYC Recycling Updates!

GrowNYC's 2019 Compost Giveaway

April 5, 2019

From May 24 to June 5, the GrowNYC Compost Program will give out free ready-to-use compost to participants who drop off their food scraps. Finished compost is a natural fertilizer that you can apply to houseplants and outdoor plants. The distributed compost is courtesy of the NYC Department of Sanitation (DSNY) and made out of residential food scraps and yard waste from New York City. For more information about getting compost from DSNY, visit nyc.gov/getcompost

Please see below for the schedule of Compost Giveaway events and refer to the Compost Program Schedule for site-specific hours. Note: additional dates for giveaways at seasonal locations will be announced soon.

The compost distribution will take place during food scrap drop-off hours at each site, while supplies last. In an effort to reuse, reduce, and recycle, we are asking participants to bring their own container. Bring a coffee beans bag, shopping bag, brown bag, cereal bag, clamshell, etc. to fill with loose compost on the day of the Compost Giveaway at your food scrap drop-off site.

 

2019 Compost Giveaway Schedule

 

Friday, May 24
149th Street Compost On-The-Go  
161st Street Compost On-The-Go
Brook Avenue Compost On-The-Go· 
    
Saturday, May 25
Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket
Inwood Greenmarket
Staten Island Mall Greenmarket
Saint George Greenmarket
    
Sunday, May 26
Carroll Gardens Greenmarket
Cortelyou Greenmarket

Tuesday, May 28
Bowling Green Greenmarket
Lenox Hill Fresh Food Box

Wednesday, May 29
96th Street Compost On-The-Go
116th Street Compost On-The-Go
137th Street City College - Compost On-The-Go
145th Street Compost On-The-Go
157th Street Compost On-The-Go         
181st Street Compost On-The-Go    
Cathedral Parkway (110th Street) Compost On-The-Go
Central Park North (110th Street) Compost On-The-Go
Dyckman Street Compost On-The-Go
Project H.O.P.E Fresh Food Box
Uptown Grand Central Fresh Food Box

Thursday, May 30
BronxWorks Fresh Food Box
Brooklyn Borough Hall Greenmarket
Columbia Greenmarket
Nos Quedamos Public Food Scrap Drop-Off Site
Parkside Plaza Compost On-The-Go
Tucker Square Greenmarket

Friday, May 31
97th Street Greenmarket

Saturday, June 1
57th Street Greenmarket
82nd Street Greenmarket
462 Halsey Community Farm Fresh Food Box
Abingdon Square Greenmarket
Brooklyn Borough Hall Greenmarket
Fort Greene Greenmarket
McCarren Park Greenmarket
TriBeCa Greenmarket
Tucker Square Greenmarket

Sunday, June 2
79th Street Greenmarket
Columbia Greenmarket
Tompkins Square Greenmarket

Wednesday, June 5
57th Street Greenmarket
Dag Hammarskjold Plaza Greenmarket
TriBeCa Greenmarket

 

Remembering GrowNYC's Founder, Marian S. Heiskell

March 17, 2019

It is with a heavy heart that we write to report the passing of our beloved founder and honorary chairwoman Marian S. Heiskell. Her vision of, and passion for, a cleaner greener NYC led to the creation of our organization in the Mayor’s Office in 1970. She tirelessly worked to raise funds and awareness in service of more green space, recycling, education, and Greenmarkets. Her wisdom, strength, generosity, and especially her kindness will be missed greatly. Her legacy lives on in the countless lives touched by all the great work she enabled.   

Truly hers was a life well lived because it was in service of others.

You can read more about Marian Heiskell's accomplishments and legacy in her New York Times obituary.

Groceries for Good

March 15, 2019
Posted in GrowNYC

Please join GrowNYC for the Whole Foods 5% Day Community Giving Program on Thursday, April 18. 5% of all sale proceeds made at Whole Foods Market locations in Manhattan will go to GrowNYC – supporting neighborhood Youthmarkets, food access programs, community gardens, recycling and environmental education for youth. GrowNYC staff will be present at select Whole Foods Market locations sharing information. Save the date and spread the word!

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