4th of July Greenmarket Schedule Changes

July 2, 2014



Friday, July 4th, schedule changes for Greenmarkets and food scrap/textile collections are below. All Saturday and Sunday markets will be OPEN this weekend.
Have a great 4th of July! 

OPEN GREENMARKETS 
Union Square Greenmarket, MN: There will be food scrap collections. 

97th Street Greenmarket, MN: There will be food scrap and textile collections. 

CLOSED GREENMARKETS 
Parkchester Greenmarket, BX: There will be NO food scrap/textile collections.
Lincoln Hospital Greenmarket, BX 
City Hall Park Greenmarket, MN
Staten Island Ferry Terminal Greenmarket, MN


 

Greenmarket Schedule Changes April 19th & 20th

April 16, 2014

Due to the Easter holiday this coming weekend, the following changes will be made to the Greenmarket schedule. 

If a market is OPEN, food scrap collections and/or textile recycling will resume normal hours. If a market is CLOSED, there will be no food scrap collections and/or textile recycling. 

82nd Street Greenmarket (Saturday, Manhattan) - CLOSED
Tompkins Square Greenmarket (Sunday, Manhattan) -  RESCHEDULED to Saturday, April 19th - food scrap collections and textile recycling will be open Saturday.
79th Street Greenmarket (Sunday, Manhattan) - OPEN
Columbia University Greenmarket (Sunday, Manhattan) - OPEN
Carroll Gardens Greenmarket (Sunday, Brooklyn) - CLOSED
Cortelyou Greenmarket (Sunday, Brooklyn) - OPEN 
Forest Hills Greenmarket (Sunday, Queens) - OPEN
Jackson Heights Greenmarket (Sunday, Queens) - OPEN

Regional Grains Project Samples Single Malt at Breuckelen Distilling

April 3, 2014
Posted in Greenmarket | Tagged greenmarkets, Grains
 
The Greenmarket Regional Grains Project witnessed accidental greatness recently during a visit to Breuckelen Distilling, where we sampled a fresh batch of single malt whiskey in the company of the masterminds behind its creation: grain farmer Thor Oechsner, maltsters Andrea and Christian Stanley of Valley Malt, and head distiller and owner Brad Estabrooke.
 
"That single malt is certainly the most exciting thing we are doing at the moment," said Brad.
 
And to think that the malt, which Brad called "perfect," came from barley that was all but useless after being pounded by the 2013 rains.
 
Thor credits Andrea for rediscovering the lost art of "providence malting -- an old technique for sprouted barley," he said. "She is the star here. She saved my crop for Brad. She figured out how to work with it."
 
A budding regional grains system at work! Just a few years ago the sprouted barley would have meant a major loss for Thor. Instead, the flourishing new markets of local malt, local whiskey and local beer mean that Thor can remain financially viable, continue feeding the regional demand for grains, and thrive as one of the region's finest farmers. And thanks to people like Andrea, Christian and Brad, that means we drinkers get to taste those grains in our favorite beers and spirits.  
 
Here's the story in Andrea's words....
 
Visiting Breuckelen was the highlight of our visit to Brooklyn where we were able to see our malt in action. Being in a room together with the farmer and distiller is a rare occurrence for me as I am usually just hanging out with my malt, but not always seeing where it goes.
 
The backstory of the barley and the malt we made for Brad was really interesting, or at least interesting if you are a malt nerd like me. 2013 was a cruel year for grains in the Northeast. We were plagued with rain in the most inopportune times, especially right when the barley was supposed to be harvested. Thor's winter barley was beautiful to look at, but under the surface something had happened when all that rain hit it after it had matured. The natural tendency of the barley seed is to sprout and reproduce. However we don't want this to happen in the field, we want it to happen in the malthouse.
 
We identified that Thor's barley had pre-harvest sprouting through a Falling-Numbers test and attempted to malt it with little luck. Textbooks say PHS is a deal breaker for the maltster. The first batches we tried to malt went for animal feed.
 
Then luck struck in November. The barley/malt/whisky Gods decided to intervene. Through the wisdom of a retired maltster, we learned of an adjusted steep schedule that would allow us to malt this PHS barley. We ran a few test batches, got things sprouting and BA-BAM we were making malt from Thor's barley. We sent a few tons to Brad at Breuckelen and he was very happy with the results. In fact the lower PH mash that this malt produced was exactly what he wanted for this single malt whisky. Given the crazy turn of events, I think this should be called Serendipity Single Malt.

A Day in the Life: Greenmarket Market Manager Lisa Valinsky

February 7, 2014
Posted in Greenmarket | Tagged A Day in the Life
 
5:00 a.m.: Alarm goes off. Hit snooze. 
 
5:09 a.m.: Alarm goes off again. This time, I get up, a bit sleepy. I put water on for tea, make a big bowl of cereal with thawed out berries from the freezer, and check the weather forecast. It only feels like 30 degrees, so that means I only have to wear three layers of pants today. Woohoo!
 
5:35 a.m.: Take the puppy out for a quick walk. It's quiet out there, and yes, it's feeling pretty warm (for February).
 
5:45 a.m.: Make a green smoothie to bring for lunch. It's loaded with Gajeski Produce spinach, and fills a quart-sized mason jar. Perfect.
 
6:00 a.m.: Publish a 79th Street update to Facebook, grab my compost, and I'm out the door.
 
6:10 a.m.: Arrive at market. Carlton from King Ferry Winery has arrived, so I say hello and we chat about the weather. I've found, in Greenmarket, just as in farming, we talk about the weather a lot. I also note the one car parked in our lane.
 
6:15 a.m.: Organize my stuff for the day, relishing in the relative quiet of an early Sunday on Columbus Avenue.
 
6:40 a.m.: The northern Manhattan van has arrived. Phebe is here! We start unloading tents, tables, bins, signs, and loads of other equipment.
 
6:45 a.m.: Red Jacket Orchards, one of our new producers at 79th Street, has arrived. A few phone calls and texts later, I get them settled into their space.
 
6:55 a.m.: Back to unloading the van. A table here, a tent there.
 
7:15 a.m.: Greet farmers and workers as they arrive. I chat with Nikki from Hot Bread Kitchen about a few food happenings in the city. Jerry, our compost coordinator, has arrived, so we catch up. The whole time we're talking I'm scanning through the market, keeping an eye out for anything that needs attending, or anyone who needs help. Early morning at 79th Street often leads to lots of vehicle maneuvering.
 
7:40 a.m.: Today's a coffee kind of day. I run over to World Coffee across the street.
 
7:45 a.m.: Troubleshoot, problem solve, take phone calls, answer texts, greet new vendors, and figure out placements of stands. All in a day's work as a market manager.
 
8:15 a.m.: Someone's waving for me to greet the tow truck driver. I run over to show which car needs to be relocated.
 
8:25 a.m.: Set up our information tent and display. We've got a whole bunch of literature to display, so I set up the apple crate and baskets and make a basic set up before my coworker Nicole gets to market at 10:00 a.m.
 
9:00 a.m.: Walk through the market again. I like to say hello and check to make sure everyone has shown up on time. We have two new vendors this week - Red Jacket Orchards and Mountain Sweet Berry Farm - that means it's time for a little social media. I take photos of their beautiful displays, and do some promotion on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. 

 
9:15 a.m.: Brainstorm with Jerry about how to get the word out more about our composting program. We fill 13 bins most weeks, but know we have a lot more people to reach. I chat a bit with a local food blogger about having her do a food demo for us this spring. She mentions dumplings, which sound like a great idea.
 
9:30 a.m.: It's market report time! I go to each producer and check them off for all types of at-market rules: arrived on time to market, tent secured, farm sign displayed, price signs displayed, purchased items sign up, baked goods ingredients sign up, and all kinds of other things. I take my time making sure everything looks in order.
 
10:20 a.m.: Rinzin from Knoll Krest hands me a lemon tart to try.
 
10:30 a.m.: Head back to our tent to say hi to Nicole, who manages 79th Street's promotions and EBT. We chat about the upcoming day, as we're planning to celebrate Chinese New Year with longevity noodles and poem writing.
 
10:45 a.m.: Brian of Gajeski Produce stops by the tent to greet us. He always checks in on Sundays.
 
11:00 a.m.: Design a sign for our new vendors, and bring it to the composting center to display.
 
11:10 a.m.: Andrew's arrived. He's our weekly volunteer, which is a huge help at this market. I start out by asking him to give breaks to farmers.
 
11:20 a.m.: Green smoothie drinking and Chinese New Year poem writing time. While writing, we have a few customers stop by to get EBT and debit/credit tokens.
 
11:45 a.m.: John from Red Jacket hands me a hot cider.

 
12:00 p.m.: Nicole and Andrew are busy preparing the noodle dish, so I make the rounds to give breaks to anyone working on their own. I break DiPaola Turkeys and Ronnybrook, Hudson Valley Duck and Berkshire Berries.
 
12:50 p.m.: Check in on the demo. It smells delicious. Our regional coordinator, Margaret, has stopped by, so we chat and I get some more social media going with photos of the noodles.
 
1:40 p.m.: More breaks! This time it's with Francesca's Bakery, Knoll Krest, and Lavender By the Bay. As I make my rounds, I check in with producers to see how the day is going, and grab a white bean and collard greens turnover from Body & Soul Bakery. The market's been hopping with this gorgeous springlike weather and lots of people are out and about.
 
2:45 p.m.: When I check in with Las Delicias, I get handed a chocolate Chunk of Heaven. It sure is. When I check-in with Divine Brine, I get handed a Devilish Dill pickle. I declare that it's my new favorite Divine Brine pickle.
 
2:50 p.m.: I'm back at the tent to find one of our regular customers. She always stops by with her two little Yorkshire Terriers, so I tell her how we're planning to do a dog portrait day this spring. We look at a potential spot for setting it up, and talk about potential volunteers. 79th Street is a big dog market, so we're hoping it'll be a big success.
 
3:00 p.m.: Nicole's off to do token redemptions with the farmers, so I stay at the tent. 
 
3:15 p.m.: Phebe is back from Columbia Greenmarket early! I start packing up the bins and chat with a few customers about the day's food demo, recipes, and Greenmarket's requirements for selling at market.
 
3:50 p.m.: Nicole is done and back at the tent, so I gather up my things and we chat about possible food demos for next week. We're always scheming with promo and demo ideas.
 
4:10 p.m.: I see a very familiar-looking puppy out of the corner of my eye...it's my husband and puppy, here to pick me up! I'm done for the day, so we wander through the market, picking up greens, eggs, and lavender sachets along the way. It's been a long day, but one with beautiful weather, and of course, lots of great food.

 

Greenmarket Staff Picks for Thanksgiving

November 19, 2013
Posted in Greenmarket | Tagged thanksgiving



Not only does our staff love working out at markets—even as it starts to get cold, over 20 will remain open until Christmas, or year-round—we love shopping at them for the same reason you do: we’re avid home cooks. See our staff picks for favorite items to buy at the market to celebrate Thanksgiving, and reference the annual Greenmarket Turkey Guide to find out where to place an order for your bird.

Greenmarket Staff Picks

“I got a pumpkin from Acevedo Farm…but I already ate it. I roasted it in the toaster oven for lunch.” – Maria Rojas, FARMroots Communications Associate 

“Oysters! We do oyster shucking at my house the night before. And a glass of Greenmarket Wheat beer to celebrate the harvest season.” – Liz Carollo, Publicity Manager

“I get my sweet potatoes from Lani’s Farm and Samascott Orchards.” – Michael Hurwitz, Greenmarket Director 

“Fuji apples from Terhune Orchards (perfect for apple pie for Thanksgiving), olive focaccia from Central Bakery for leftover sandwiches, Ronnybrook cream (perfect for whipping for a pumpkin pie topping) and Amantai Farm's broccoli (it's the best) for the perfect veggie side for dinner. There’s so much! It’s hard to choose just one favorite.” – Brittany Ryan, Socrates, Forest Hills and Astoria Greenmarket Manager 

“Bakers Bounty's challah loaf with Wilklow Orchard's Winesap apples for some apple-challah stuffing!” – Luciana Ramirez, City Hall and Fort Greene Greenmarket Manager

“Greg Lebak's [Lebak Farm] Brussels sprouts, sauteed then roasted and topped with parmesan! They are small, sweet (after a frost or two) and delicious.” – Samantha Blatteis, Union Square Greenmarket Manager

“I guess I would say quince from Treelicious Orchards, to make a quince chutney. We put it out with cheese and crackers as an appetizer.” – Caroline Hiteshew, Publicity Assistant and Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket Manager

“Divine Brine's Cranberry apple chutney for a new twist on cranberry sauce.” – Luz Portillo, Mount Sinai, Poe Park and Inwood Greenmarkets EBT and Market Manager 

“Potato salad with Bill Maxwell’s [Maxwell’s Farm] carola potatoes.” – Rob Shepherd, EBT Project Associate

“I really love a delicata squash from Joe O’Brien [Healthway Farm].”  –  Alexis Stevens, EBT Project Manager

 “Farmer Ground Flour for cornmeal. I like to add cornbread to my stuffing.” – June Russell, Manager of Farm Inspections, Strategic Development and Regional Grains Project

“Pre-made lard pie crust from Flying Pigs Farm,”  – Davy Hughes, Union Square Greenmarket Operations Manager

“Apples from Locust Grove to make Four and Twenty Blackbirds recipe for apple pie.” – Cheryl Huber, Greenmarket Assistant Director

“Hot Bread Kitchen challah for the most buttery and delicious turkey stuffing. Thanksgivukkah, baby!” – Kathleen Crosby, Tompkins Square, Fort Washington and Abingdon Square Greenmarket Manager
 
“Tiogo's [preserved] bourbon peaches...with Ronnybrook vanilla ice cream!” – Allison Campbell, Bensonhurst and Bay Ridge Greenmarket Manager

“Cranberry horseradish chutney from Beth’s Farm Kitchen, the perfect condiment on a turkey sandwich made with leftovers.” – Jeanne Hodesh, Greenmarket Communications Associate

Autumn at Greenmarkets: Union Square Night Market, JetBlue, Big Apple Crunch and Thanksgiving

November 19, 2013
Posted in Greenmarket

As it always is, October was a busy month at Greenmarket. There was our Night Market in Union Square, which drew a lively hard cider sipping crowd well past sunset, our pop-up market at Jet Blue showcasing the flavor of New York, which was well received by New Yorkers on their way out of town and visitors just stepping off flights on their way into the Big Apple. And speaking of apples, we celebrated Food Day with the Big Apple Crunch at markets around the city.
 
Just around the corner is our undisputed favorite holiday, Thanksgiving! Visit your neighoborhood market to shop for all of your Thanksgiving ingredients and don't forget to pre-order your turkey from a Greenmarket farmer. A few of our Thursday/Friday markets hold special days of operation earlier in the week so that customers can shop for their Thanksgiving ingredients. See below for that list. 
 
Thanksgiving Re-scheduled Markets
97th Street Greenmarket – Open Wednesday, November 27 (closed Friday, November 29)
Bowling Green Greenmarket - Open Wednesday, November 27 (closed Thursday, November 27)
City Hall Greenmarket - Open Wednesday, November 27 (closed Friday, November 29)
Columbia University Greenmarket – Open Tuesday, November 26 (closed Thursday, November 27)
Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket - Open Wednesday, November 27
Tucker Square Greenmarket - Open Wednesday, November 27th (closed Thursday, November 27)

**NOTE: Aside from Columbia University's Tuesday market, these additional market days will not have food scrap or textile recycling collections. 

Union Square Autumn Night Market Friday, October 18

October 9, 2013

 
Union Square Autumn Night Market
Union Square Greenmarket - north end of Union Square Park [map]
Friday, October 18th, 4 - 8 p.m.
 
Celebrate the fall harvest and Cider Week with Greenmarket
 
On Friday, October 18th, the Union Square Greenmarket will host the Union Square Autumn Night Market, a celebration of the fall harvest which will feature farm fresh produce, meats, and cheeses, and a curated roster of restaurants serving prepared foods.
 
Along with all of the delicious food served that evening, there will be programming for families, live music by Jazz Foundation of America, as well as a bar featuring New York State wine, Brooklyn Brewery's Greenmarket Wheat and hard cider for Cider Week
 
All of your favorite Friday Greenmarket farmers will be in attendance, along with these restaurants selling individual dishes, desserts and beverages:
 
 
This event is free and open to the public and hosted in collaboration with the Union Square Partnership.

Interview with Garrett Oliver, Brewmaster at Brooklyn Brewery

September 20, 2013
Posted in Greenmarket | Tagged Grains, Beer

 

Garrett Oliver is the brewmaster at the Brooklyn Brewery, author of The Brewmaster’s Table and one of the foremost authorities in the world on the subject of beer. We were thrilled to have Garrett work with regional grain growers and local malting facility, Valley Malt, in order to develop a recipe for Greenmarket Wheat beer.

We asked Garrett a few questions about his experience working with these local ingredients for the first time.

What qualities about the Greenmarket Wheat distinguish it from other beers you’ve brewed? 

GO. Brooklyn once had 48 breweries and made 10% of all the beer in the United States – it was one of the great brewing capitals of the world. But even in those days most of the grains were coming from the Midwest. Greenmarket Wheat is one the first beers made with mostly New York State ingredients in over 100 years. I was one of the founding board members for Slow Food USA, so the opportunity to do this is very exciting for me.

What qualitative comments do you have on the local malt you worked with for the Greenmarket Wheat? Compare its qualities to other malts you’ve worked with. Are there noticeable differences? Does it remind you of any other malts?

GO. Both the malted barley and the un-malted wheat are quite good. They have a round and sweet character. Those flavors come through beautifully into this beer. For the Greenmarket beer I chose the traditional Belgian witbier (white beer) style. There were a number of reasons, but the main reason is that wheat grows well in New York State. Barley is grown in the state, but there are no malting facilities of any size in New York. So it made sense to brew a style that uses raw wheat. Fortunately we were able to find good New York State barley and have it nicely malted (sprouted and dried) by Valley Malt across the border in Hadley, Mass. The beer is about 40% raw wheat and 60% malted barley. Eventually I think we can get the New York State grain content up to 90% or so.

What does it mean to experiment with new malts for a beer? How is it different from experimenting with hops, yeast, or other ingredients that give character to a beer? 

GO. We use a wide variety of malts at Brooklyn Brewery. When we taste a new malt we brew a mini-mash, which extracts all the sugars and aromas from the grains, and taste that. The wheat, from Kevin Richardson of North Country Farms, smells a little like cream of wheat, or like pasta boiling in a pot. The Valley Malt, made from barley grown by Peter Martens, is mildly sweet and very aromatic, a bit like baking biscuits in the oven. We ferment the beer with a Belgian yeast and lightly spice it with orange peel and coriander, which is traditional for this type of beer. Then the beer is bottled completely flat, gaining all of its carbonation through a natural secondary fermentation in the bottle, just like Champagne. So this beer is really old-school, and the techniques we use give it real texture and depth. It’s great with food.

In the past, you have described different beers as being like your favorite albums. Extend your musician/album analogy to the Greenmarket Wheat. What kind of song is it? What are you saying in the song? 

GO. As an artisan, you hope to have a long, interesting career. If things go the way you want, your skills grow over time and your work gains greater and greater depth and quality. It’s sort of like being a jazz musician, and the beers are like songs. And just as I might want to listen to different types of music on different days, I’m going to be in the mood for different beers as well. And I think that the analogy extends into the work itself. Technical ability without soul ends up being empty – that’s what the industrial brewers have. You have to have something to say, and also the skills needed to “say” it. In our beers, I always strive for elegance, no matter what the beer is. And Greenmarket Wheat is a great way to express the principles that Brooklyn Brewery has always stood for. I’m told that we were the first 100% wind-powered building in NYC. This beer gets us closer to being the brewery we want to be.

The Northeast is in the process of rebuilding it’s infrastructure for growing and processing grains. These are still new, young businesses without a track record or expertise and could even be risky to work with if a batch does not work out.  What is it like to work more directly with farmers and maltsters who are developing their own knowledge base and skills?

GO. Valley Malt is more than twice as expensive as any malt we’ve ever purchased, but we understand that the cost is justified. They have to build their malting business up to where they have economy of scale, and we want to support them in that. We have to make sure, along with the grower and the maltster, that what they’re giving us is up to the standards we need in order to make the beer we want. Peter, Andrea and Kevin are all attuned to that aspect of things, so they’re a pleasure to work with. Beer was originally a farm product – real beer is as agricultural a food as you can imagine. New York State once led the nation in hop farming – we’re looking to use New York State hops as well.

Has the opportunity to talk with the farmers whose products go into your beer deepened your appreciation of your product and what it takes to create a beer? 

GO. We’ve always known many of our people. Until recently, though, many of our suppliers have either been in the Midwest or other countries. In the case of hops, we bought all of our hops through brokers, but we didn’t really know the farmers themselves. That’s’ changed over the past few years. One of our most recent Brewmaster’s Reserve special releases, Scorcher #366, is actually a beer that was made to tell the story of the hop farmers. “#366” is a new hop variety that’s still not commercialized, and this beer features it. People who read about that beer will come away knowing something about the farmers and their work. The idea is to connect the consumer to the farmer, and pass credit for the quality of the beer back down the line to its roots. 

How has the conversation around “local beer” progressed over the past several years? 

GO. In the past we’ve been cautious about promoting what we’re doing with local ingredients and green practices. The reality is that “no good deed goes unpunished” and it’s easy to end up accused of green-washing.  We don’t want to go there. No business is going to be perfect with regards to the environment, but I think we’re doing very well. We’re using wind power, our spent grain goes back to the farms to feed animals, and now we’re able to make beer from ingredients grown on nearby land.

What future do you see for beer with local ingredients, particularly in consumers’ demand for it?

GO. When we’re able to feature NYS bred and grown hops that’ll be a great day. I think it’s coming soon – people are working hard on rebuilding our local hop industry. Back in the day we used to have everything in NYC, and all of our markets were full of local produce. Then, over the last century, we walked away from the farm and away from the producer. We wrapped our lives in plastic and walked away from real food. The food “revolution” that’s happening is actually more of a “renaissance” – it’s a recovery from a broken, unappetizing and unhealthy food system. We’re making great progress, and GrowNYC is a big part of that in NYC. And real beer is good for you. Greenmarket Wheat is unfiltered and chock full of vitamins. Even government health guidelines will tell you that it’s good for you to have a beer every day. So people should drink up!

You can pick up a bottle of Greenmarket Wheat at the Union Square Greenmarket on Wednesdays and Saturdays. It will also be served at the upcoming Farm Aid concert in Saratoga Springs, NY on Saturday, September 21. 

Fall Cookbook Signings at the Union Square Greenmarket

September 9, 2013

This fall, meet some your favorite cookbook authors, chefs and food world luminaries as they sell their cookbooks at the Union Square Greenmarket

Saturday, September 14, 10 - 2 p.m.
Book signing with Hiroko Shimbo, author of Hiroko's American Kitchen and Hiroko's Kitchen.

Wednesday, September 18, 10 – 1 p.m.
Book signing with Miriam Rubin, author of Tomatoes

Saturday, September 28, 10 - 1 p.m.
Book signing with Liz Neumark, author of Sylvia's Table 

Saturday, October 12th, 11 – 2 p.m.
Book signing with Dina Falconi, author, and Wendy Hollender, illustrator of Foraging & Feasting

Saturday, November 2, 11 - 2 p.m. 
Book signing with Michael Anthony, head chef at Gramercy Tavern

Greenmarket book signings are hosted in partnership with Food Book Fair

Plastic Cleanse: This April, BYO Bag

April 2, 2018
Posted in Greenmarket

 

Why Bring Your Own Bags? 

Single-use plastic bags are environmentally harmful.

• Even when properly disposed of, because of their weight and aerodynamic properties, plastic bags often become litter, clogging storm drains and waterways.

• New Yorkers use 9.37 billion carryout bags per year, the vast majority of which are not recycled.

• Plastic bags account for over 1,700 tons of residential garbage per week in NYC on average.

Plastic bags cost the public money. 

• Each year, New York City pays an estimated $12.5 million to transport 91,000 tons of plastic bags to landfills in other states.

• Shopping bags jam expensive machinery at recycling plants and contaminate the recycling stream, increasing costs.

Tips for a Plastic Purge!

1. Bring your own reusable totes, produce bags, and containers (great for fish and delicate produce) while shopping at Greenmarkets.

2. Say ‘no thank you’ if you are offered a plastic bag, or ask for a paper bag.

3. Carry a few extra reusable bags with you at all times. 

4. If you forget to BYOB, you can purchase reusable tote bags and produce bags at most Greenmarket Market Information tents. 

5. Collect your food scraps in resuable containers before dropping off at a food scrap collection location. 

6. Go #foamfree and quit using styrofoam for good. Learn more here

Instagram Contest on the @unsqgreenmarket Account!

We invite our followers to participate in a Plastic Cleanse social media contest! We know that single use bags are environmentally harmful. In NYC alone, they generate about 1700 tons of residential garbage on a weekly basis. We’re here to encourage you to make a difference and join our annual Plastic Cleanse. Show us how you shop plastic-free at the Greenmarket!

Photos can be taken at market or at home, we want to see how you avoid using plastic while shopping.  Two winners will receive a gift card to a restaurant that supports the Greenmarket and will be regrammed by the @unsqgreenmarket accounts.

Contest rules:

  • Take a photo and post it to your Instagram, Twitter, or Facebook account of your plastic-free shopping supplies before heading to market, a plastic-free interaction at market, or of your plastic-free market haul after shopping.

  • Tag @unsqgreenmarket and hashtag #GMKTnyc #PlasticCleanse to enter

  • Dates to enter are 4/3 - 4/30/18.

  • GrowNYC and Greenmarket staff, volunteers, farm staff, or farmers, or family members are not eligible to win.

  • Open to NYC residents. Contest ends at 11:59:59 PM ET on 4/30/18.

  • On 5/1/18, GrowNYC will pick 2 winners at random to receive a gift card to a local restaurant that shops at the Greenmarket.

Learn more about GrowNYC’s sustainability efforts: 
www.grownyc.org

#plasticcleanse

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