Deck the Halls - Christmas trees + holiday wreaths at Greenmarkets

Get your locally grown Christmas trees, wreaths, and boughs from a local farmer. A list of markets where you can stock up on holiday greens follows:

Caradonna Farms: Trees (Union Square Wednesday, Saturday)
Fiori Di Fenice: Wreaths (Union Square, Saturday) 
Floral Beauty Greenhouse: Douglass fir trees (Columbia, Sunday)
Keith's Farm: Organic trees and wreaths (Union Square Wednesday, Saturday)
Lebak Farms: Wreaths (Grand Army Plaza, Saturday)
Mountain Sweet Berry Farm: Wreaths and princess pines (Union Square, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday)
Rexcroft Farm: Trees, wreaths, garlands (Dag Hammarskjold, Wednesday; Fort Greene, Saturday) 
River Garden: Dried flower wreaths (Union Square, Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday)
Stokes Farm: Herb wreaths (Tucker, Thursday, Saturday; Union Square, Saturday)
Trumansburg Tree Farms: Trees and wreaths (Union Square Wednesday (12/18), Friday (12/20), Saturday; Grand Army Plaza, Saturday (12/7)
Van Houten Farms: Trees and wreaths (Union Square, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday)

Greenmarket Staff Picks for Thanksgiving

Not only does our staff love working out at markets—even as it starts to get cold, over 20 will remain open until Christmas, or year-round—we love shopping at them for the same reason you do: we’re avid home cooks. See our staff picks for favorite items to buy at the market to celebrate Thanksgiving, and reference the annual Greenmarket Turkey Guide to find out where to place an order for your bird.

Greenmarket Staff Picks

“I got a pumpkin from Acevedo Farm…but I already ate it. I roasted it in the toaster oven for lunch.” – Maria Rojas, FARMroots Communications Associate 

“Oysters! We do oyster shucking at my house the night before. And a glass of Greenmarket Wheat beer to celebrate the harvest season.” – Liz Carollo, Publicity Manager

“I get my sweet potatoes from Lani’s Farm and Samascott Orchards.” – Michael Hurwitz, Greenmarket Director 

“Fuji apples from Terhune Orchards (perfect for apple pie for Thanksgiving), olive focaccia from Central Bakery for leftover sandwiches, Ronnybrook cream (perfect for whipping for a pumpkin pie topping) and Amantai Farm's broccoli (it's the best) for the perfect veggie side for dinner. There’s so much! It’s hard to choose just one favorite.” – Brittany Ryan, Socrates, Forest Hills and Astoria Greenmarket Manager 

“Bakers Bounty's challah loaf with Wilklow Orchard's Winesap apples for some apple-challah stuffing!” – Luciana Ramirez, City Hall and Fort Greene Greenmarket Manager

“Greg Lebak's [Lebak Farm] Brussels sprouts, sauteed then roasted and topped with parmesan! They are small, sweet (after a frost or two) and delicious.” – Samantha Blatteis, Union Square Greenmarket Manager

“I guess I would say quince from Treelicious Orchards, to make a quince chutney. We put it out with cheese and crackers as an appetizer.” – Caroline Hiteshew, Publicity Assistant and Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket Manager

“Divine Brine's Cranberry apple chutney for a new twist on cranberry sauce.” – Luz Portillo, Mount Sinai, Poe Park and Inwood Greenmarkets EBT and Market Manager 

“Potato salad with Bill Maxwell’s [Maxwell’s Farm] carola potatoes.” – Rob Shepherd, EBT Project Associate

“I really love a delicata squash from Joe O’Brien [Healthway Farm].”  –  Alexis Stevens, EBT Project Manager

 “Farmer Ground Flour for cornmeal. I like to add cornbread to my stuffing.” – June Russell, Manager of Farm Inspections, Strategic Development and Regional Grains Project

“Pre-made lard pie crust from Flying Pigs Farm,”  – Davy Hughes, Union Square Greenmarket Operations Manager

“Apples from Locust Grove to make Four and Twenty Blackbirds recipe for apple pie.” – Cheryl Huber, Greenmarket Assistant Director

“Hot Bread Kitchen challah for the most buttery and delicious turkey stuffing. Thanksgivukkah, baby!” – Kathleen Crosby, Tompkins Square, Fort Washington and Abingdon Square Greenmarket Manager
 
“Tiogo's [preserved] bourbon peaches...with Ronnybrook vanilla ice cream!” – Allison Campbell, Bensonhurst and Bay Ridge Greenmarket Manager

“Cranberry horseradish chutney from Beth’s Farm Kitchen, the perfect condiment on a turkey sandwich made with leftovers.” – Jeanne Hodesh, Greenmarket Communications Associate

Autumn at Greenmarkets: Union Square Night Market, JetBlue, Big Apple Crunch and Thanksgiving

As it always is, October was a busy month at Greenmarket. There was our Night Market in Union Square, which drew a lively hard cider sipping crowd well past sunset, our pop-up market at Jet Blue showcasing the flavor of New York, which was well received by New Yorkers on their way out of town and visitors just stepping off flights on their way into the Big Apple. And speaking of apples, we celebrated Food Day with the Big Apple Crunch at markets around the city.
 
Just around the corner is our undisputed favorite holiday, Thanksgiving! Visit your neighoborhood market to shop for all of your Thanksgiving ingredients and don't forget to pre-order your turkey from a Greenmarket farmer. A few of our Thursday/Friday markets hold special days of operation earlier in the week so that customers can shop for their Thanksgiving ingredients. See below for that list. 
 
Thanksgiving Re-scheduled Markets
97th Street Greenmarket – Open Wednesday, November 27 (closed Friday, November 29)
Bowling Green Greenmarket - Open Wednesday, November 27 (closed Thursday, November 27)
City Hall Greenmarket - Open Wednesday, November 27 (closed Friday, November 29)
Columbia University Greenmarket – Open Tuesday, November 26 (closed Thursday, November 27)
Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket - Open Wednesday, November 27
Tucker Square Greenmarket - Open Wednesday, November 27th (closed Thursday, November 27)

**NOTE: Aside from Columbia University's Tuesday market, these additional market days will not have food scrap or textile recycling collections. 

#GivingTuesday 2013 is coming…

How do you give back?

We’ve all heard of Black Friday and Cyber Monday, but what about #GivingTuesday?

This year on Tuesday, December 3, GrowNYC is joining a national movement to celebrate and encourage giving: a day when charities, families, students, businesses, community centers, and others come together for #GivingTuesday - a day dedicated to celebrate giving and encourage more, smarter giving during the Holiday Season. Mark your calendar. #GivingTuesday 2013 is Tuesday, December 3rd.

#GivingTuesday is about doing what you can to give back. It’s about showing that all of us can do so much more with our wallets than just consume. Last year #GivingTuesday included more than 100,000 individuals participating in ways that matter to them.

All of us here at GrowNYC know that you care about making a difference, and that's why we invite you to join #GivingTuesday. Donate, spread the word, volunteer for groups you care about (we hope that includes GrowNYC!) and encourage your friends to give in lieu of gifts or just because.

So mark your calendar and on December 3rd take action in ways that means something to you.

#Giveback this #GivingTuesday!

To learn more go to givingtuesday.org.

Be sure to follow us on twitter @grownyc, and share how you give back with #givegrownyc

INFOGRAPHIC: A History of Food Stamps at GrowNYC's Farmers Markets

This marks the 8th year that GrowNYC has been accepting EBT at Greenmarkets across the city.  The program has come a long way since our initial partnership with the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets in 2005.  

Read all about it below!

A Pop-Up Greenmarket at JetBlue's T5 at JFK Airport

GrowNYC is proud to announce that we'll be partnering with JetBlue on a pop-up Greenmarket in T5 at JFK Airport on October 29th, 30th, & 31st.

From the press release:

From October 29 - 31, 2013, travelers will be able to experience the Greenmarket at T5 and take a taste of New York home with them. The market will include education stations, a harvest-themed photo booth, a bike blender for people-powered cooking demonstrations, a composting pile with live worms, and a recycling game. The T5 Greenmarket will also include an array of goods all made from products grown locally in New York State. Products include baked goods, pies, grains, honey, jam, maple syrup, fruit, pickles, tomato sauce, wine, as well as Greenmarket Wheat Beer and Hard Cider.

"GrowNYC has been connecting upstate farmers with New York City shoppers for nearly four decades; by offering the best that New York state has to offer from its rich fields and orchards," said Marcel Van Ooyen, Executive Director of GrowNYC. "Our Greenmarkets ensure that all New Yorkers have access to fresh, healthy food; now, JetBlue customers will be able to take a taste of the State with them when they pass through T5 on their way out of town. We hope they’ll share the bounty our state has to offer with others far and wide."

Greenmarket's 2013 Turkey Buying Guide

Thanksgiving is just around the corner—November 28th, to be exact—and turkey orders are already filling fast! Find out below what local farms are bringing pasture-raised Thanksgiving turkeys to your neighborhood Greenmarket.

Arcadian Pastures

Breed: Broad Breasted White
Where to order: Union Square Greenmarket Wednesdays, Greenpoint/McCarren Park Greenmarket Saturdays, Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket Saturdays ($20 deposit required)
Where and when to pick up: Greenpoint/McCarren Park Greenmarket and Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket Saturday, Nov 23rd, Union Square Greenmarket Wednesday, Nov 27th.

Dipaola Turkey

Breed: Broad Breasted White (parts and sausage also available)
Where to order and pick up: At the Greenmarket locations below, online, or by contacting the farm at 609.587.9311

79th Street Sundays
97th Street Fridays
Abingdon Square Saturdays
Brooklyn Borough Hall Saturdays
Carroll Gardens Sundays
Columbia Sundays
Cortelyou Sundays
Dag Hammarskjold Wednesdays ‡
Forest Hills
Fort Greene Saturdays
Grand Army Plaza Saturdays

Greenpoint Saturdays
Inwood Saturdays
Jackson Heights Sundays
St. George Saturdays
Stuyvesant Town Sundays
Sunnyside Saturdays
Tompkins Square Park Sundays
Tribeca Saturdays
Tucker Square Saturdays
Union Square Wednesdays & Fridays

† Market open Wednesday before Thanksgiving for pick-ups.
‡ For ordering only; orders at Dag Hammarskjold Plaza will be delivered to Union Square Wednesday Nov 27 unless otherwise requested.

Garden of Spices

Breed: Broad Breasted White, and goose for Thanksgiving and Christmas
Where to order: Abingdon Square Greenmarket Saturdays and Union Square Greenmarket Wednesdays
Where and when to pick up: Union Square Greenmarket on Wednesday, Nov 27th.

Northshire Farm

Breed: Broad Breasted White
Where to order: Union Square Greenmarket Saturdays or by emailing northshirefarm@hotmail.com (for email orders, $30 required at next market day)
Where and when to pick up: Union Square Greenmarket on Wednesday, Nov 27th (by noon).

Norwich Meadows

Breed: Great White
Where to order: Union Square Greenmarket Mondays, Fridays and Saturdays and Tompkins Square Greenmarket Sundays
Where and when to pick up: Tompkins Square Greenmarket on Sunday, Nov 24th or Union Square Greenmarket on Monday, Nov 25th or Wednesday, Nov 27th.

Roxbury Mountain Maple

Breed: Broad Breasted White (halves available)
Where to order: Union Square Greenmarket Mondays and Wednesdays or by calling 607-538-1500 ($20 deposit required)
Where and when to pick up: Union Square Greenmarket on Monday, Nov 25th or Wednesday, Nov 27th.

Stannard Farm

Breed: Broad Breasted White
Where and how to order: Columbia University Greenmarket Sundays, 92nd Street Greenmarket Sundays, or Tompkins Square Greenmarket Sundays
Where and when to pick up: Columbia University Greenmarket Sunday, Nov 24th or Tuesday, Nov 26th, 92nd Street Greenmarket Sunday, Nov 23rdor Tompkins Square Greenmarket Sunday, Nov 23rd.

Tamarack Hollow Farm

Breeds: Broad Breasted Bronze, Red Bourbon, Midget White
Where and how to order: Union Square Greenmarket Wednesdays or by emailing tamarackhollowfarm@gmail.com
Where and when to pick up: Union Square Greenmarket on Wednesday, Nov 27th.

Violet Hill Farm

Breed: Broad Breasted White
Where and how to order: Union Square Greenmarket Saturdays or by emailing vhmeat@gmail.com
Where and when to pick up: Union Square Greenmarket on Saturday, Nov 23rd or Wednesday, Nov 27th.

Quattros Game Farm

Breeds: Wild, Broad Breasted White, Bourbon Red
Where and how to order: Union Square Greenmarket Saturdays
Where and when to pick up: Union Square Greenmarket on Saturday, Nov 23rd or Wednesday, Nov 27th.

 

Union Square Autumn Night Market Friday, October 18

 
Union Square Autumn Night Market
Union Square Greenmarket - north end of Union Square Park [map]
Friday, October 18th, 4 - 8 p.m.
 
Celebrate the fall harvest and Cider Week with Greenmarket
 
On Friday, October 18th, the Union Square Greenmarket will host the Union Square Autumn Night Market, a celebration of the fall harvest which will feature farm fresh produce, meats, and cheeses, and a curated roster of restaurants serving prepared foods.
 
Along with all of the delicious food served that evening, there will be programming for families, live music by Jazz Foundation of America, as well as a bar featuring New York State wine, Brooklyn Brewery's Greenmarket Wheat and hard cider for Cider Week
 
All of your favorite Friday Greenmarket farmers will be in attendance, along with these restaurants selling individual dishes, desserts and beverages:
 
 
This event is free and open to the public and hosted in collaboration with the Union Square Partnership.

The Educated Eater Re-cap: Regional Farming in a Changing Climate

In case you weren’t able to make it to New School last week for our Educated Eater panel discussion, Regional Farming in a Changing Climate, a video of the event is available below. Farmer Keith Stewart of Keith’s Farm, Sonali McDermaid of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies, and Beatriz Beckford, New School faculty member, joined GrowNYC’s FARMroots director Challey Comer to talk about the impacts of the changing climate on regional agriculture, here in the northeast, globally, and how these changes effect our food security as city residents.

"Winners and losers, start to develop globally," said McDermaid, of farmers who are already being severly impacted by climate change. "A rethinking of how we define our markets is in order. Farmers need options. When you don't have options, you can't compete. And when you can't compete, you become disadvantaged in the global market."

"We do things that are insurance against these large scale climate events. Organic farmers grow diversified crops, so we don't have all of our eggs in one basket," noted Stewart. He also said, "We need to take farm preservation seriously. I think the city needs to start thinking not just about its water shed, but about its food shed."

Watch their full conversation below, and join us for the next Educated Eater on November 7, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at The International Culinary Center. We’ll be discussing the future of dairy farming in the Northeast.

Interview with Garrett Oliver, Brewmaster at Brooklyn Brewery

 

Garrett Oliver is the brewmaster at the Brooklyn Brewery, author of The Brewmaster’s Table and one of the foremost authorities in the world on the subject of beer. We were thrilled to have Garrett work with regional grain growers and local malting facility, Valley Malt, in order to develop a recipe for Greenmarket Wheat beer.

We asked Garrett a few questions about his experience working with these local ingredients for the first time.

What qualities about the Greenmarket Wheat distinguish it from other beers you’ve brewed? 

GO. Brooklyn once had 48 breweries and made 10% of all the beer in the United States – it was one of the great brewing capitals of the world. But even in those days most of the grains were coming from the Midwest. Greenmarket Wheat is one the first beers made with mostly New York State ingredients in over 100 years. I was one of the founding board members for Slow Food USA, so the opportunity to do this is very exciting for me.

What qualitative comments do you have on the local malt you worked with for the Greenmarket Wheat? Compare its qualities to other malts you’ve worked with. Are there noticeable differences? Does it remind you of any other malts?

GO. Both the malted barley and the un-malted wheat are quite good. They have a round and sweet character. Those flavors come through beautifully into this beer. For the Greenmarket beer I chose the traditional Belgian witbier (white beer) style. There were a number of reasons, but the main reason is that wheat grows well in New York State. Barley is grown in the state, but there are no malting facilities of any size in New York. So it made sense to brew a style that uses raw wheat. Fortunately we were able to find good New York State barley and have it nicely malted (sprouted and dried) by Valley Malt across the border in Hadley, Mass. The beer is about 40% raw wheat and 60% malted barley. Eventually I think we can get the New York State grain content up to 90% or so.

What does it mean to experiment with new malts for a beer? How is it different from experimenting with hops, yeast, or other ingredients that give character to a beer? 

GO. We use a wide variety of malts at Brooklyn Brewery. When we taste a new malt we brew a mini-mash, which extracts all the sugars and aromas from the grains, and taste that. The wheat, from Kevin Richardson of North Country Farms, smells a little like cream of wheat, or like pasta boiling in a pot. The Valley Malt, made from barley grown by Peter Martens, is mildly sweet and very aromatic, a bit like baking biscuits in the oven. We ferment the beer with a Belgian yeast and lightly spice it with orange peel and coriander, which is traditional for this type of beer. Then the beer is bottled completely flat, gaining all of its carbonation through a natural secondary fermentation in the bottle, just like Champagne. So this beer is really old-school, and the techniques we use give it real texture and depth. It’s great with food.

In the past, you have described different beers as being like your favorite albums. Extend your musician/album analogy to the Greenmarket Wheat. What kind of song is it? What are you saying in the song? 

GO. As an artisan, you hope to have a long, interesting career. If things go the way you want, your skills grow over time and your work gains greater and greater depth and quality. It’s sort of like being a jazz musician, and the beers are like songs. And just as I might want to listen to different types of music on different days, I’m going to be in the mood for different beers as well. And I think that the analogy extends into the work itself. Technical ability without soul ends up being empty – that’s what the industrial brewers have. You have to have something to say, and also the skills needed to “say” it. In our beers, I always strive for elegance, no matter what the beer is. And Greenmarket Wheat is a great way to express the principles that Brooklyn Brewery has always stood for. I’m told that we were the first 100% wind-powered building in NYC. This beer gets us closer to being the brewery we want to be.

The Northeast is in the process of rebuilding it’s infrastructure for growing and processing grains. These are still new, young businesses without a track record or expertise and could even be risky to work with if a batch does not work out.  What is it like to work more directly with farmers and maltsters who are developing their own knowledge base and skills?

GO. Valley Malt is more than twice as expensive as any malt we’ve ever purchased, but we understand that the cost is justified. They have to build their malting business up to where they have economy of scale, and we want to support them in that. We have to make sure, along with the grower and the maltster, that what they’re giving us is up to the standards we need in order to make the beer we want. Peter, Andrea and Kevin are all attuned to that aspect of things, so they’re a pleasure to work with. Beer was originally a farm product – real beer is as agricultural a food as you can imagine. New York State once led the nation in hop farming – we’re looking to use New York State hops as well.

Has the opportunity to talk with the farmers whose products go into your beer deepened your appreciation of your product and what it takes to create a beer? 

GO. We’ve always known many of our people. Until recently, though, many of our suppliers have either been in the Midwest or other countries. In the case of hops, we bought all of our hops through brokers, but we didn’t really know the farmers themselves. That’s’ changed over the past few years. One of our most recent Brewmaster’s Reserve special releases, Scorcher #366, is actually a beer that was made to tell the story of the hop farmers. “#366” is a new hop variety that’s still not commercialized, and this beer features it. People who read about that beer will come away knowing something about the farmers and their work. The idea is to connect the consumer to the farmer, and pass credit for the quality of the beer back down the line to its roots. 

How has the conversation around “local beer” progressed over the past several years? 

GO. In the past we’ve been cautious about promoting what we’re doing with local ingredients and green practices. The reality is that “no good deed goes unpunished” and it’s easy to end up accused of green-washing.  We don’t want to go there. No business is going to be perfect with regards to the environment, but I think we’re doing very well. We’re using wind power, our spent grain goes back to the farms to feed animals, and now we’re able to make beer from ingredients grown on nearby land.

What future do you see for beer with local ingredients, particularly in consumers’ demand for it?

GO. When we’re able to feature NYS bred and grown hops that’ll be a great day. I think it’s coming soon – people are working hard on rebuilding our local hop industry. Back in the day we used to have everything in NYC, and all of our markets were full of local produce. Then, over the last century, we walked away from the farm and away from the producer. We wrapped our lives in plastic and walked away from real food. The food “revolution” that’s happening is actually more of a “renaissance” – it’s a recovery from a broken, unappetizing and unhealthy food system. We’re making great progress, and GrowNYC is a big part of that in NYC. And real beer is good for you. Greenmarket Wheat is unfiltered and chock full of vitamins. Even government health guidelines will tell you that it’s good for you to have a beer every day. So people should drink up!

You can pick up a bottle of Greenmarket Wheat at the Union Square Greenmarket on Wednesdays and Saturdays. It will also be served at the upcoming Farm Aid concert in Saratoga Springs, NY on Saturday, September 21. 

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